A Latin Grammar: Founded on Comparative Grammar

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Ginn and Heath, 1881 - Latin language - 329 pages
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Page 279 - rises the | fountain's | silvery | column; In the Pen|tameter | aye || falling in | melody | back." 1 Called pentameter by the old grammarians, who divided it, formally, into five feet (two dactyls or spondees, a spondee, and two anapaests), as follows: — II — ww|
Page 251 - ne ob eam rem aut suae magno opere virtuti tribueret, aut ipsos despiceret: se ita a patribus majoribusque suis didicisse, ut magis virtute quam dolo contenderent, aut insidiis niterentur. Quare ne committeret, ut is locus ubi constitissent ex calamitate populi Romani et internecione exercitus nomen caperet, aut memoriam proderet.
Page 139 - rather than the second, and in the second rather than the third : as, si tu et Tullia valetis ego et Cicero valemus (Fam. xiv. 5), if you and Tullia are well, Cicero and I are well. [Notice that the first person is also first in order, not last, as by courtesy in English.]
Page 251 - ubi eos Caesar constituisset atque esse voluisset: sin bello persequi perseveraret, reminisceretur et veteris incommodi populi Romani, et pristinae virtutis Helvetiorum. Quod improviso unum pagum adortus esset, cum ii qui flumen transissent suis auxilium ferre non
Page 166 - e. Duration of Time and extent of Space are expressed by the accusative (see 256, 257). f. The subject of the Infinitive Mood is in the accusative This is especially frequent after words of Knowing, Thinking, Telling, and Perceiving (verba sentiendi et declarandi)?
Page 251 - patribus majoribusque suis didicisse, ut magis virtute quam dolo contenderent, aut insidiis niterentur. Quare ne committeret, ut is locus ubi constitissent ex calamitate populi Romani et internecione exercitus nomen caperet, aut memoriam proderet.
Page 256 - and uterque— may take a plural verb. 7. The Subject of a finite verb is in the NOMINATIVE. 8. A Noun used to limit or define another, and not meaning the same thing, is put in the GENITIVE. 9. The Genitive is used to denote the author, owner, source, and (with adjectives) measure or quality.
Page 248 - change of person and tense (if necessary), as in the reporter's style, and in Sanskrit. 335. A Direct Quotation is one which gives the exact words of the original speaker or writer. An Indirect Quotation is one which adapts the original words to the construction of the sentence in which they are quoted.
Page 331 - TEXT-BOOKS. Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar. Revised, Enlarged, and Printed from new plates in 1877. A Latin Grammar for schools and colleges, founded on Comparative Grammar. By JH ALLEN, Lecturer at Harvard University, and JB GREENOUGH, Professor of Latin at Harvard University. I2mo. Half morocco. 329 pages (including supplementary Outlines of Syntax, with new and greatly enlarged Index).
Page 245 - that an animal aims at something. quod rediit nobis mirabile videtur (Off. iii. 31), that he [Regulus] returned seems wonderful to us. vetus illud Catonis admodum scitum est, qui mirari se aiebat quod non rideret haruspex haruspicem cum vidisset (de

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