A Latin Grammar for Schools, Based on the Principles and Requirements of the Grammatical Society

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S. Sonnenschein & Company, 1892 - Latin language - 219 pages
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Page 21 - So too are all infinitives (verb-nouns) eg dulcE et decoruM est pro patria MORI, ' it is sweet and seemly to die for one's country...
Page 141 - ... overwhelmingly large. That grammarians do not hesitate to call was a 'subjunctive' in such utterances as 'If he was here' appears from the following: 1932 Curme (Syntax p. 58) observes: "This use of was as a past subjunctive arose in the seventeenth century", and 1905 Onions (Adv. Eng. Syntax 55) avers: "When the Principal Clause speaks of what "would be", or "would have been", both Clauses take the Subjunctive, as in Latin and German: a) Present Tense 'If he did this, he would sin'", and...
Page 112 - On the other hand, this series is designed to supplement and not to supplant the teacher. Exposition and discussion are therefore confined to narrow limits. The object of the promoters has been to present in as brief space as possible a conspectus of the main features of the languages. 3.— Uniformity of Size and Type. All the Grammars are printed in three sizes of type— Small Pica, Long Primer, and Brevier — corresponding to three stages of learning. A line down the margin gives additional...
Page 214 - STRONGLY it bears us along in swelling and limitless billows, Nothing before and nothing behind but the sky and the Ocean. II. THE OVIDIAN ELEGIAC METRE DESCRIBED AND EXEMPLIFIED. IN the hexameter rises the fountain's silvery column; In the pentameter aye falling in melody back.
Page 140 - Those in which the Principal Clause does not speak of what would be or would have been, and the If-Clause implies nothing as to the fact or fulfilment (Open Condition) : eg " If you are right, I am wrong ", " If the sky falls, we shall catch larks.
Page 114 - Equivalents. The Noun, the Adjective, and the Adverb may be replaced by other parts of speech doing the same work in the sentence, or by a group of words doing the work of a single part of speech. A word or group of words which replaces a Noun, an Adjective, or an Adverb is called an Equivalent (Noun-equivalent, Adjective-equivalent, or Adverb-equivalent).
Page 112 - UNIFORMITY OF SCOPE. The Series is designed to meet the needs of High Schools and Grammar Schools. Each Grammar is therefore of sufficient scope to cover the whole school course. Experience has shown the importance of utilising the local memory, but this advantage is sacrificed if the pupil passes from book to book and from one arrangement of the page to another. On the other hand, this Series is designed to supplement and not to supplant the teacher. Exposition and discussion are therefore confined...
Page iv - I.— UNIFORMITY OF CLASSIFICATION AND TERMINOLOGY. The same grammatical phenomenon is classified alike and named alike wherever found. Slightly different phenomena are described by slightly different but not inconsistent names. A pupil using these Grammars will therefore not be distracted by discordant grammatical views or puzzled by divergent formulae where a single formula would suffice. The order of the various Grammars being identical, mastery of one involves mastery of the principles and methods...
Page iv - Grammars will therefore not be distracted by discordant grammatical views or puzzled by divergent formulas where a single formula would suffice. The order of the various Grammars being identical, mastery of one involves mastery of the principles and methods of the others. These important results are attained without any revolution in terminology. It has been found that the existing stock of names, if used economically, is sufficient, or very nearly sufficient. Syntax is based on Analysis of Sentences;...
Page 4 - The Numbers are the Singular and the Plural : — The Singular speaks of one. The Plural speaks of more than one. THE FIVE DECLENSIONS. There are five declensions of Nouns (ie five ways of 'declining' them), to be known by the ending of the Genitive Singular (which may be found in the dictionary).

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