A Latin Grammar for the Use of Schools

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Ginn brothers, 1888 - Latin language - 504 pages
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Page 216 - Verbs compounded with the prepositions ad, ante, con, in, inter, ob, post, prae, sub, and super...
Page 375 - Cocytusque sinu labens circumvenit atro. quod si tantus amor menti, si tanta cupido est, bis Stygios innare lacus, bis nigra videre Tartara, et insano juvat indulgere labori, 135 accipe, quae peragenda prius.
Page 372 - Wilt thou then that we go and gather them up ? But he said, Nay; lest while ye gather up the tares, ye root up the wheat with them. Let both grow together until the harvest...
Page 375 - Romam oratores pacis peteudae (Liv. IX. 45). § 418. Sometimes the gerund is employed less accurately, so as to have the appearance of a passive signification, inasmuch as it either (especially in the genitive) merely designates the action of the verb in general, and so takes the place of a substantive (eg movendi for motus), or is referred in idea to some other agent than the grammatical subject of the proposition: — Multa vera videntur neqve tamen habent insiguem et propriaxn percipiendi notam...
Page 341 - Is ita vivebat, ut nulla tam exquisita posset inveniri voluptas, qua non abundaret. Erat et cupidus voluptatum, et cujusvis generis ejus intelligens et copiosus ; ita non superstitiosus, ut illa plurima in sua patria sacrificia et fana contemneret ; ita non timidus ad mortem, ut in acie sit ob rempublicam interfectus.
Page 410 - Campagna p. 382 ff. 1.11. quid? alii quaestores norme fecerunt?] iq omiserunt facere. Ernesti and Wunder are wrong in reading non from one inferior MS, because nonne is found in several other places, where we should expect to find non, the rule being that ' by a question with nonne a certainty is expressed that a thing is, with non surprise that it is not and a doubt of the possibility of its being denied' Madv. Gr. § 451 c, obs. Cf. Tusc. I § 17 quifi? si rogavero te àliq1nd, nonne respondebis?...
Page 300 - THE SUBJUNCTIVE. § 346. In the subjunctive a thing is asserted simply as an idea conceived in the mind, so that the speaker does not at the same time declare it as actually existing; eg curro, ut sudem. In some kinds of subordinate propositions the subjunctive is also used of a thing which the speaker asserts as existing, in order to show that it is not considered by itself, but as a subordinate member of another leading idea ; eg ita cucurri, ut vehementer sudarem.1 In the leading proposition the...
Page 211 - Duo iuilitea neqvaqvam visu ac specie aestiaiautibua pares (Liv. VII. 10). § 242. The dative is particularly joined to many verbs which in themselves denote an acting in reference to something. Many transitive verbs express an action, which, besides the object acted on, concerns another person or thing with reference to which it is performed, and therefore take two substantives, the proper object in the accusative, and a reference object, or more remote object, to which the action is directed, in...
Page 395 - His enim rebus imbutae mentes baud sane abhorrebunt ab utili ac vera sententia. Quid est enim verius, quam neminem esse oportere tam stulte arrogantem, ut in se rationem et mentem putet inesse, in caelo mundoque non putet?
Page 299 - The epistolary style in Latin has this peculiarity, that the writer often has in his eye the time when the letter will be read, and therefore, instead of the present and perfect, uses the imperfect and pluperfect, where the receiver would use these tenses, in reporting the substance of the letter, while referring it back to the time of writing : — Nihil habebam, qvod...

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