A Life of Picasso Volume II: 1907 1917: The Painter of Modern Life

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Random House, Sep 30, 2011 - Art - 512 pages
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John Richardson draws on the same combination of lively writing, critical astuteness, exhaustive research, and personal experience which made a bestseller out of the first volume and vividly recreates the artist's life and work during the crucial decade of 1907-17 - a period during which Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque invented Cubism and to that extent engendered modernism.

Richardson has had unique access to untapped sources and unpublished material. By harnessing biography to art history, he has managed to crack the code of cubism more successfully than any of his predecessors. And by bringing a fresh light to bear on the artist's often too sensationalised private life, he has succeeded in coming up with a totally new view of this paradoxical man of his paradoxical work. Never before has Picasso's prodigious technique, his incisive vision and not least his sardonic humour been analysed with such clarity.

 

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Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 24
Section 25
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29
Section 30
Section 31

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 22
Section 23
Section 32
Section 33
Section 34
Section 35
Section 36
Section 37
Section 38
Section 39
Section 40
Section 41
Section 42
Section 43
Section 44
Copyright

About the author (2011)

John Richardson has written books on Manet and Braque, and has been a contributor to the New York Review of Books, the New Yorker and Vanity Fair. The first volume of his Life of Picasso won the Whitbread Book of the Year Award in 1991. In 1993 he was made a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. In 1994 - 95 he served as the Slade Professor of Art at Oxford University. He lives between Conneticut and New York City.

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