A Long Way from Solving that One: Psycho/social and Ethical Implications of Ross Macdonald's Lew Archer Tales

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University Press of America, 1990 - Psychology - 141 pages
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The purpose of this book is to study Ross Macdonald's detective fiction as an example of popular culture. The author applies cross-methodological approaches to Macdonald's novels specifically, H. Richard Niebuhr's ethics to The Underground Man, Freudian theories of society to The Moving Target and examines popular culture's social function in terms of Robert Merton's functional analysis of popular culture. In addition, the work includes an overview of hard-boiled detective fiction and a review of previous critical approaches to Macdonald, as well as a summary conclusion and an appendix on adaptations of detective novels to movies.
 

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Contents

THE MORALITY OF THE HARDBOILED DETECTIVE IN A FALLEN WORLD
1
2 The Genres Assumptions About the World
4
3 Social and Ethical Assumptions
10
4 Conclusions
15
EGO CONTROL AND INDEPENDENCE IN THE MOVING TARGET
17
1 A Freudian Vision of Society
18
2 Freuds Analysis of Popular Culture
22
3 Narrative Analysis
32
THE SOCIAL AND ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE ARCHER TALES
91
1 The Individual in Society
92
2 The Conservative Nature of Popular Culture
94
3 The Focus on the Individual
96
4 The Absence of Monotheism
98
5 A Popular Fiction for the Intellectual Class
100
FROM NOVEL TO FILM
105
2 Film as Popular Art
112

4 Conclusions
48
THE ETHICS OF RESPONSIBILITY IN THE UNDERGROUND MAN
53
1 Responsible Dialogue
56
Responsible Relationship in the Underground Man
70
3 Conclusions
82
3 Adaptation
115
4 Narrative Difference
121
5Conclusions
126
BIBLIOGRAPHY
129
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About the author (1990)

Jeffrey H. Mahan teaches media and ministry at Garrett-Evangelical Seminary in Evanston, Illinois.

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