A Lost Frontier Revealed: Regional Separation in the East Midlands

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Univ of Hertfordshire Press, Apr 1, 2010 - History - 320 pages
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A traveller through the length and breadth of England is soon aware of cultural differences, some of which are clearly visible in the landscape. The eminent English historian Charles Phythian-Adams has put forth that England, through much of the last millennium, could be divided into regional societies, which broadly coincided with groups of pre-1974 counties. These shire assemblages in turn lay largely within the major river drainage systems of the country. In this unusual study Alan Fox tests for, and establishes, the presence of an informal frontier between two of the proposed societies astride the Leicestershire-Lincolnshire border, which lies on the watershed between the Trent and Witham drainage basins. The evidence presented suggests a strong case for a cultural frontier zone, which is announced by a largely empty landscape astride the border between the contrasting settlement patterns of these neighbouring counties.
 

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Contents

The hypothesis
3
The Test Area
11
Land and people of the proposed frontier
45
Economic characteristics and contrasts
61
Cultural expressions
78
Personal spatial loyalties
99
in probate administrations 17011810
122
Kinship and dynastic moulds
138
County and town polarities
150
Overall judgement and findings
169
Appendix
183
Bibliography
189
lndex
206
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Alan Fox is an honorary visiting fellow of the University of Leicester, where he teaches local history.

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