A Major Selection of the Poetry of Giuseppe Ungaretti

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Exile Editions, Ltd., 1997 - Poetry - 467 pages
2 Reviews
Ungaretti’s beautiful biography is a splendid poetic portrait of the spirit of the first half of this century, in Italy and in the whole of Europe. This is the first time anywhere that all of the poet’s verse has been presented in translation.
 

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By just seeing what others have said about the beautiful way Ungaretti writes, it's only a matter of time before I dip into this poet's work and experience it for myself.

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gioseppe ungaretti

Contents

Foreword
13
Eternal
25
Africa Recalled
31
LOVE
33
My People
37
In Memoriam
43
Lindoro of the Desert
49
Sunset
55
Quiet
199
The Captain
205
Where the Light
211
You Damn Me with Finesse
221
Cain
235
Damnation
243
First Canto
249
Third Canto
255

Tonight
61
Meloncholy
67
Rivers
73
Pilgrimage
79
Nostalgia
85
Italia
91
Christmas
97
Morning
103
Pleasure
111
Vanity
121
Wanderer
127
Prayer
133
Night
141
Silence in Liguria
151
Mermaids
157
A Dove
163
Hymn to Death
169
In July
175
Echo
187
Dream
193
Sixth Canto
261
Have Lost Everything
277
Bitter Association
295
Towards a Pine
303
You Too Are My River
309
Will It Come to Pass?
315
Shout No More
321
Song
331
Recitative of Palinuro
349
Finale
355
I Cant Breathe
361
They Flew
367
Last Cantos for the Promised Land
377
Cantetto Without Words
401
September 121966
415
The Color of Shadows
433
Ungaretti the Man and the Poet
447
Bibliographical Note
468
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Born in Egypt of Tuscan parents, Ungaretti went to Paris in 1912 to complete his education, attending the lectures of Henri Bergson and forming friendships with distinguished members of the avant-garde, including Picasso, Modigliani, and Apollinaire. For a time he was swept up by the futurist movement of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, affected more by its nationalistic spirit, however, than by the new poetics. A lover of the written word, Ungaretti's aim in poetry was to find a new language that was simple, precise, melodious, and compelling. His World War I experiences in the Italian army inspired his earliest poetry, first in Italian, Il porto sepolto (1916), and then in French, La guerre (1919). A 1923 edition of the former included a preface by Benito Mussolini. In 1936 Ungaretti left Italy to teach Italian literature in Brazil, out of which grew his subsequently published critical essays on Dante, Petrarch (see also Vol. 4), Vico, and Leopardi, but he returned to Italy in 1942. After Italy's defeat in the war, he received critical attention internationally, spent the year 1964 teaching at Columbia University, and returned to Milan, where he died. Allegria di naufragi (The Joy of Shipwrecks) has been the very Leopardian title of a number of editions of his poems. A translator of Shakespeare, Blake, Gongora, Racine, and Mallarme, Ungaretti was for a long time the leading poet of the so-called hermetic school; but, in retrospect, it becomes clear that his chief models for the craft of poetry were Leopardi and Petrarch.

Bibliographic information