A Man Who Loved the Stars

Front Cover
University of Pittsburgh Pre, May 15, 1988 - Biography & Autobiography - 224 pages
The inspiring story of a man whose avocation as a stargazer and vocation as a millwright led to his development of lenses, mirrors and other astronomical apparatus. John A. Brashear's technological advances were later employed by astronomers in the United States and Europe. Brashear also attracted the friendship and financial support of astronomer Samuel Lagley, railroad magnate William Thaw, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Carnegie, who gave him $20,000 for the construction of Allegheny Observatory in Pittsburgh. The inspiring story of a man whose avocation as a stargazer and vocation as a millwright led to his development of lenses, mirrors and other astronomical apparatus. John A. Brashear's technological advances were later employed by astronomers in the United States and Europe. Brashear also attracted the friendship and financial support of astronomer Samuel Lagley, railroad magnate William Thaw, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Carnegie, who gave him $20,000 for the construction of Allegheny Observatory in Pittsburgh.
 

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Contents

I Ancestry and Boyhood
1
Religion and Marriage
13
III Astronomy and Music
22
IV Making the First Telescope
31
V Life in the Iron Mills
39
VI Making the TwelveInch Reflector
47
VII Home and Friends
58
VIII Going into Business for Myself
65
XI The New Shops and William Thaw
88
XII First Trip to Europe
97
XIII Trip to Great Britain
116
XIV The Old Allegheny Observatory and Professor Langley
127
XV The New Allegheny Observatory
133
XVI Life at Muskova
145
XVII Educational Activities
156
XVIII Third Trip Abroad
167

IX The Rowland Diffraction Gratings
73
X RockSalt Prisms and Other Work
80
Appendix
181
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

James V. Maher, who contributed the introduction, is Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor of the University of Pittsburgh. He is a former professor of physics and astronomy at the University.

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