A Manual of Gardening for Bengal and Upper India

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Thacker, Spink and Company, 1874 - Gardening - 623 pages
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Page 353 - at least thirty feet from the ground to the lowest leaves. I frequently counted from twenty to twenty-four leaves on a single tree, the stalk of each leaf being six or eight feet long, and the broad leaf itself four or six feet more.
Page 82 - Have the tongue at the upper part of the shoot, so as not to be in the part which forms the bow, as it is of consequence that it should be within two inches of the surface, so as to feel the effects of the atmospheric heat, Unless this is attended to, the roots will not be emitted quickly."*
Page 338 - It is the tender white leaves of the flowers, chiefly those of the male, that yield that most delightful fragrance for which they are so universally and deservedly esteemed. For of all perfumes
Page 453 - from tho blossoms to expose them to the dew, so that each morning these beautiful objects lie uncovered; but as day advances, the leaves gradually droop and bend down over the flowers, to guard them from the rays of the sun."*
Page 353 - This tree has been most celebrated for containing, even during the most arid season, a large quantity of pure fresh water in the thick firm ends of the
Page 89 - healthy and fruitful by keeping their roots near the surface. The root-pruning and biennial removal, so earnestly recommended, are the proper means to bring about these results, as they place the roots within the influence of the sun and air. The ground over the roots of
Page 563 - thread. By having the plants clothed with branches in this way, and by keeping the leaves in a green and healthy state, the specimens never have that bare and broom-headed appearance which they often .present in England.
Page 196 - tender; but eight or ten minutes' steeping, it is said, will make it so soft, that it will drop in pieces from the spit before it is well roasted, or turn soon to rags in boiling.
Page 196 - Natural History of Jamaica;' namely, that water impregnated with the milky juice of this tree is thought to make all sorts of meat washed in it tender; but eight or ten minutes' steeping, it is said, will make it so soft, that it will drop in pieces from the spit before it is well roasted, or turn soon to rags in
Page 451 - uncommonly beautiful when in flower, few surpassing it in the elegance of its numerous long pendulous racemes of large bright-yellow flowers, intermixed with the young lively green foliage.

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