A Mathematical Mosaic: Patterns & Problem Solving

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Brendan Kelly Publishing Inc., 1996 - Mathematics - 254 pages
1 Review
Excerpt from a review in the "Mathematics Teacher." A Mathematical Mosaic is a collection of wonderful topics from nmber theory through combinatorics to game theory, presented in a fashion that seventh- and eighth- grade students can handle yet high school students will find challenging." John Cocharo, Saint Mark's School of Texas, Dallas, TX
 

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Contents

The Secret Behind the Magic Birthday Predictor Cards
30
Do What You Enjoy
40
How the Mathematical Card Trick Works
51
Game Theory
64
Social Choice Theory
73
The Falling Ladder Problem
85
The World Series
92
The Triangles of Pascal Chu ShihChieh and Sierpinski
98
The Pythagorean Pentagram The Golden Mean Strange Trigonometry
154
A DoIt Yourself Proof of Herons Formula
160
From Common Sense to Einstein
166
More Locus Hokus Pokus
173
The Harmonic Series
179
Sherlock Holmes Secret Strategy
186
The Man Who Solved the System of the World
196
A Big Yes Goes Through my Head
205

Chessboard Coloring
105
Another Chessboard Tiling Problem
111
Numbers Numbers and More Numbers
118
Prime Numbers in Number Theory
124
A Strange Result in Base 2 and Base 5
131
A Mathematical Genius of the Highest Order
137
Fibonacci The Golden Mean
146
Three Impossible Problems of Antiquity
215
Infinity Revisited
226
An Infinitude of Infinities
234
The Youngest Tenured Professor in Harvard History
241
Annotated References
248
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About the author (1996)

Dr. Ravi Vakil is a Professor of Mathematics at Stanford University. A preeminent scholar, Dr. Vakil is conducting research on the cutting edge in algebraic geometry, yet he is also known for his exceptional ability to make complex mathematical concepts understandable to the intelligent lay reader. Professor Vakil is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and an AMS Centenniel Fellow. When he was an undergraduate, Ravi demonstrated his remarkable problem solving abilities by placing–every year–among the top five competitors in the prestigious Putnam Mathematical Competition.

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