A Matter of Degrees: What Temperature Reveals about the Past and Future of Our Species, Planet, and U niverse

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Penguin, Jul 1, 2003 - Science - 320 pages
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In a wonderful synthesis of science, history, and imagination, Gino Segrč, an internationally renowned theoretical physicist, embarks on a wide-ranging exploration of how the fundamental scientific concept of temperature is bound up with the very essence of both life and matter. Why is the internal temperature of most mammals fixed near 98.6°? How do geologists use temperature to track the history of our planet? Why is the quest for absolute zero and its quantum mechanical significance the key to understanding superconductivity? And what can we learn from neutrinos, the subatomic "messages from the sun" that may hold the key to understanding the birth-and death-of our solar system? In answering these and hundreds of other temperature-sensitive questions, Segrč presents an uncanny view of the world around us.
 

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A matter of degrees: what temperature reveals about the past and future of our species, planet, and universe

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Popular science books are usually those that explain the latest breakthrough or tell a compelling story of the human quest for knowledge. True fans of the genre know, however, that the science ... Read full review

Contents

THE RULER THE CLOCK AND
98 6
MEASUREFOR MEASURE
READING THE EARTH
LIFE IN THEEXTREMES
MESSAGES FROM THE
THE QUANTUM LEAP
References
Acknowledgments
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Gino Segrč is professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. An internationally renowned expert in high-energy elementary-particle theoretical physics, Segrč has served as director of Theoretical Physics at the National Science Foundation and received awards from the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. This is his first book.

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