A Matter of Life and Death: Inside the Hidden World of the Pathologist

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Canongate Books, Apr 15, 2010 - Science - 384 pages
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A Matter of Life and Death tells fascinating stories of mysterious illnesses and miraculous scientific breakthroughs. But it is also crammed full of extraordinary characters – from the forensic anthropologist with his own Body Farm in Tennessee to the doctor who had a heart-and-lung transplant and ended up using her own lungs for research.
 

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This is a fascinating book. Fantastic concept, selection of pathologists and their stories of what it took to reach where they have, makes you wonder how passion and perseverance prevails in face of adversities. It uplifts spirits. Although the book has a purchase value - the value it delivers to a reader is priceless.  

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
PHYSICIAN HEAL THYSELF
11
CHILDREN ARE NOT JUST LITTLE ADULTS
28
READING THE BONES
48
WITNESS TO THE RAVAGES OF AIDS
68
LESSONS FROM THE BODY FARM
85
CANCER IN CLOSEUP
107
THE DEADLY SECRETS OF SPANISH
127
FROM ONE GENERATION TO THE NEXT
204
OF ROUGH POLITICS AND POWERFUL PATHOLOGY
224
SHAKEN BABIES AND UNSHAKABLE MINDS
243
A MARRIAGE OF ART AND SCIENCE
260
EASING THE PAIN OF LOSS
280
STEM CELLS AND THE BODYS REMARKABLE CAPACITY
298
FORENSICS IN A CULTURE OF VIOLENCE
313
LESSONS IN LIVING AND DYING
336

WHO WAS THE FIRST PATHOLOGIST?
147
SCIENCE IN THE SERVICE OF HUMAN RIGHTS
168
MAD COWS AND HUMAN DISEASE
187
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
356
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Sue Armstrong is a science writer and broadcaster living in Edinburgh. As a foreign correspondent she worked for a variety of media including the New Scientist and BBC World Service. She has also undertaken a variety of assignments writing reports for the World Health Organisation and UNAIDS.

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