A Measured Life: The Times and Places of an Orphaned Intellectual

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Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 1994 - Biography & Autobiography - 753 pages

Richard Hoggart's book, "The Uses of Literacy, "established his reputation as a uniquely sensitive and observant chronicler of English working-class life. This large volume vividly depicts his origins in that setting. It is an autobiographical account combining Hoggart's three masterful works, "A Local Habitation, A Sort of Clowning, "and "An Imagined Life, "in which he details his life from 1918 to the present.

The first part of the trilogy (1918-1940) describes Hoggart at an early age, recreating his circle of family and friends. It ends with him earning his degree from Leeds University, and about to leave Yorkshire to go into the army. The second section (1940-1959) opens in wartime England and moves into the beginnings of Hoggart's career in writing. The final installment (1959-1991) traces and assesses a changing Britain and Europe and finds Hoggart reconsidering to his childhood. The book provides vivid insight into the life of one of Britain's outstanding writers, and chronicles changes in working-class and English culture after World War I to the present.

Following the original publication, Philip Oakes of "The Times Literary Supplement "wrote, "He writes with a passion that is usually well banked, but which flows now and then with a visionary intensity. It is a remarkable way of looking at England." Beryl Bainbridge, writing for the "New Statesman, "said, "The setting of his own life in the context of social history makes Hoggart the ideal autobiographer." "A Measure Life "will be an enjoyable and insightful read for students of literature, culture, and English history as well as admirers of Richard Hoggart. Few will walk away from this volume without being the wiser with respect to Western liberal thought in our times.

 

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Contents

Introduction to the American Edition ix
xxxix
Acknowledgments xvii
xlvii
potternewton
31
Newport street 56
88
leeds at large
121
jack lane
138
cockburn
156
university
184
WANDERING TEACHER
71
TAKING STOCK
175
On Writing a Life and Times 204
204
PROVINCIAL AND NATIONAL THE 1960S
1
and the Pilkington Report 19602 47
47
Liberated? 113
113
INTERNATIONAL LIFE AND BACK TO BRITAIN
143
Culture Communications Censorship Revisited
217

index
221
THE WAR YEARS
1
Convictions Language
263
Index
303

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Page xxxiii - He will attack his subject in unexpected places; he will fall upon the flank, or the rear; he will shoot a sudden, revealing searchlight into obscure recesses, hitherto undivined. He will row out over that great ocean of material, and lower down into it, here and there, a little bucket, which will bring up to the light of day some characteristic specimen, from those far depths, to be examined with a careful curiosity.

About the author (1994)

Richard Hoggart was born in Leeds, England on September 24, 1918. He studied at Leeds University. During World War II, he served as an anti-aircraft gunner in the Royal Artillery. After the war, he worked as an extramural tutor at Hull University for 13 years. In 1951, he published his first book, a full-length study of WH Auden's poetry. His other works include The Uses of Literacy, An Idea and Its Servants, and Townscape with Figures. He taught at several universities including the University of Leicester, the University of Birmingham, and Goldsmiths College in London. He was a decisive witness in the 1960 Lady Chatterley trial, which liberalised British pornography laws and was instrumental in creating BBC2 as a quality television channel. He died on April 10, 2014 at the age of 95.

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