A Memoir of Charles Louis Sand: Including a Narrative of the Circumstances Attending the Death of Augustus Von Kotzebue : Also, A Defence of the German Universities

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Printed for G. & W.B. Whittaker, 1819 - Assassins - 92 pages
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Page xxii - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Page xl - ... power in such hands, it is doubly bound in common sense, and for common safety, so to conduct itself that the people may not find an interest in public confusions. They will always suffer much and long before they are effectually roused ; nothing, therefore, can kindle the flame but such oppressions of some classes or order in...
Page xl - They will always suffer much and long before they are effectually roused ; nothing, therefore, can kindle the flame but such oppressions of some classes or order in the society as give able men the opportunity of seconding the general mass; discontent will soon diffuse itself around; and if the government take not warning in time, it is alone answerable for all the burnings, and plunderings, and devastation, and blood that follow.
Page xiii - De minoribus rebus principes consultant, de maioribus omnes, ita tamen ut ea quoque, quorum penes plebem arbitrium est, apud principes pertractentur.
Page 18 - Murder !" had already gathered about the spot, and still flourishing the poniard in one hand, and a written paper in the other, exclaimed, " I am the murderer, and it is thus all traitors should die." Then he fell upon his knees, .and clasping his hands raised them to heaven exclaiming, " I thank Thee, O God, for having permitted me successfully to fulfil this act of justice.' Upon the paper were inscribed the words, " Deathblow for Augustus von Kotzebue in the name of Virtue.
Page 7 - Konigsberg; and afterwards, in 1816, by connecting him with the department of foreign affairs, as counsellor of state. In 1817, he received a commission to go to Germany, in order to send reports directly to the Emperor Alexander on the state of literature and public opinion in Germany. He settled for this purpose at Weimar, where he published, at the same time, a Literary Journal, in which he constituted himself judge of all...
Page xxvii - ... to require some discretion in its application to actual conduct. A Timoleon, a Scaevola, a Brutus, if they teach any thing, teach that an invasion of public liberty is a private wrong, which every individual is called upon by the noblest principles of his nature to redress by his own right hand ; and, lest the example of the patriot should be thought too weak for the encouragement of such virtue, the precepts of the sage and of the lawgiver add fresh incitement to the aspiring student.
Page vii - has observed the extraordinary sen sation created by the fate of M. Kotzebue, and has been very forcibly struck by the great degree of involuntary sympathy every where so eagerly manifested in favour of the perpetrator Sand, whose portrait he frequently saw exhibited in frames containing those of the most distinguished German patriots.
Page xxiii - ... threat to the rulers of the Continent, and intimates his opinion, that without a great change of system, the dagger of the assassin may soon become the ordinary weapon of political reformation. " Although the whole subject (says he, speaking of Sand's case,) is involved in a maze of inextricable difficulty, it is not the less •worthy of minute and careful examination ; for if, as a very shrewd German lately observed to the Editor, there are many thousand individuals amongst the youth of Germany...
Page 3 - ... warmth of their affection for him. His person was engaging, his manners agreeable and the uniform propriety of his conduct in the highest degree examplary. His remarkable docility, and the eager thirst for knowledge with which he was inspired produced in him a frame of mind, most...

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