A Memory of War

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2003 - Fiction - 352 pages
2 Reviews
Psychologist Alexander Lescziak savors a life of quiet sophistication on Manhattan's Upper West Side, turning a blind eye to the past of his Polish migr parents. Then a new patient declares that he is the doctor's half-brother, the product of a union between Lescziak's Jewish mother and a German prisoner of war. The confrontation jolts Lescziak out of his complacency: suddenly, his failing marriage, his wife's infatuation with his best friend, and the disappearance of his young lover and suicidal patient, Nella, close in on him. Lescziak escapes into the recesses of his imagination, where his mother's affair with the German prisoner comes to life in precise, gorgeous detail. The novel unfolds into a romance set in England's Lake District in wartime, as Busch shows how our past presses on the present.
 

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User Review  - krbrancolini - LibraryThing

I feel slightly guilty only giving "A Memory of War" four stars. Frederick Busch is a wonderful writer. I was disappointed by this book, but I think that is due to my faulty expectations. I selected ... Read full review

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User Review  - TimBazzett - LibraryThing

I guess my tags here say it all: holocaust, Auschwitz, Jews, family relationships, psychotherapy, adultery, World War II (and passing references to WWI too), and Vietnam. The fact is, there's so much ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

1
13
2
59
3
100
4
145
5
190
6
233
7
285
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About the author (2003)

Frederick Busch (1941–2006) was the recipient of many honors, including an American Academy of Arts and Letters Fiction Award, a National Jewish Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award. The prolific author of sixteen novels and six collections of short stories, Busch is renowned for his writing’s emotional nuance and minimal, plainspoken style. A native of Brooklyn, New York, he lived most of his life in upstate New York, where he worked for forty years as a professor at Colgate University.

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