A Model for Communication about Biotechnology

Front Cover
Sense Publishers, 2006 - Education - 100 pages
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This book incorporates two major themes into a model for communication about biotechnology. The first is that of a communicating community, defined as a relatively coherent social group engaging in communication within itself. As biotechnologists do not constitute a unitary group, this book refers to biotechnology communities. Similarly, the broad notion of 'the public' is considered to be inadequate, and the notion of distinct public communities is used. The members of each community are considered to have a view of biotechnology made up of their understandings of the nature of science of biotechnology, understandings of the key concepts and models used in biotechnology, perceptions of the nature of risk, and beliefs and attitudes about biotechnology. The second major theme is that of search space. This is the intersection, in a virtual arena, of the components of the 'views' of two communities. Where there are elements that are in common to the two, communication in terms of them is possible. Where there is no commonality, the degrees of understanding reached must be used to construct a mutual understanding that may evolve into an agreement.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The need for improved communication about modern biotechnology
3
Changing attitudes to the applications of science and technology
4
New Zealands pathway to the Royal Commission Report
6
Bridging the divide between biotechnologists and the community
10
The need for a model of communication
11
An enquiry
13
Design and procedure
14
Beliefs attitudes and behaviour
37
The notion of search space
39
Endpiece
40
Knowledge and risk
41
The nature of science
43
The nature of technology
45
Perceptions of risk
46
Developing trust between experts and the public
49

An analysis of the biotechnologists responses
15
Issues for the biotechnology enterprise to consider
19
Clues to the composition of a search space
20
Indications for the development of our model
21
Building a model Language and the making of meaning
23
The existing models of science and technology communication
24
Identification of communicating communities
26
The nature of language
28
The making of meaning between discourse communities
33
The notions of explanation and explaining
34
The notions of argument and argumentation
35
CHAPTER 5 The model and a programme of research and development
51
Preliminary evaluation of the model
52
The last word
54
Acknowledgements
55
References
56
Public concerns about Transgenic Animals
63
Embryonic stem cells and human therapeutic and reproductive cloning6
69
Environmental impacts of genetically modified organisms
79
The safety of genetically modified foods
89
Intellectual Property Protection Relationship to public perceptions of biotechnology
97
Copyright

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