A Month in the Country: A Comedy in Two Acts

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Samuel French, Inc., 2009 - Drama - 110 pages
1 Review
Comedy / 8 m., 5 f., 1 c. / Int./ext. A bored wife living in the Russian countryside falls in love with her little boy's handsome new tutor, just like all of the women in the household. The wife's chief rival turns out to be her 17 year old ward; they make a wonderful portrait of two different women in love. "What a charming play.... The workmanship is carefully wrought. The lines of characterization are fine.... It seems like a breath of fresh air." N.Y. Times. FEE: $75 per performance.
 

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User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

Natalya Petrovna is a 29-year-old married woman of affluence, living in the country with her husband, as well as their family friend Rakitin. They have hired a young tutor, Belyaev, for their son, as ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
4
Section 2
6
Section 3
62
Section 4
109
Section 5
113
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About the author (2009)

Ivan Turgenev, 1818 - 1883 Novelist, poet and playwright, Ivan Turgenev, was born to a wealthy family in Oryol in the Ukraine region of Russia. He attended St. Petersburg University (1834-37) and Berlin University (1838-41), completing his master's exam at St. Petersburg. His career at the Russian Civil Service began in 1841. He worded for the Ministry of Interior from 1843-1845. In the 1840's, Turgenev began writing poetry, criticism, and short stories under Nikolay Gogol's influence. "A Sportsman's Sketches" (1852) were short pieces written from the point of view of a nobleman who learns to appreciate the wisdom of the peasants who live on his family's estate. This brought him a month of detention and eighteen months of house arrest. From 1853-62, he wrote stories and novellas, which include the titles "Rudin" (1856), "Dvorianskoe Gnedo" (1859), "Nakanune" (1860) and "Ottsy I Deti" (1862). Turgenev left Russia, in 1856, because of the hostile reaction to his work titled "Fathers and Sons" (1862). Turgenev finally settled in Paris. He became a corresponding member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in 1860 and Doctor of Civil Law at Oxford University in 1879. His last published work, "Poems in Prose," was a collection of meditations and anecdotes. On September 3, 1883, Turgenev died in Bougival, near Paris.

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