A Month in the Country: After Turgenev

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Dramatists Play Service Inc, 1993 - English drama - 105 pages
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THE STORY: Natalya Petrovna, once wooed and won over by the rich landowner Arkady Sergeyevich, has now suffered a long and frustrating marriage. She has taken comfort in the love of Michel, a family friend, but even he has come to represent the sam
 

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Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
68
Section 3
105
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Ivan Turgenev, 1818 - 1883 Novelist, poet and playwright, Ivan Turgenev, was born to a wealthy family in Oryol in the Ukraine region of Russia. He attended St. Petersburg University (1834-37) and Berlin University (1838-41), completing his master's exam at St. Petersburg. His career at the Russian Civil Service began in 1841. He worded for the Ministry of Interior from 1843-1845. In the 1840's, Turgenev began writing poetry, criticism, and short stories under Nikolay Gogol's influence. "A Sportsman's Sketches" (1852) were short pieces written from the point of view of a nobleman who learns to appreciate the wisdom of the peasants who live on his family's estate. This brought him a month of detention and eighteen months of house arrest. From 1853-62, he wrote stories and novellas, which include the titles "Rudin" (1856), "Dvorianskoe Gnedo" (1859), "Nakanune" (1860) and "Ottsy I Deti" (1862). Turgenev left Russia, in 1856, because of the hostile reaction to his work titled "Fathers and Sons" (1862). Turgenev finally settled in Paris. He became a corresponding member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in 1860 and Doctor of Civil Law at Oxford University in 1879. His last published work, "Poems in Prose," was a collection of meditations and anecdotes. On September 3, 1883, Turgenev died in Bougival, near Paris.

Brian Friel was born Bernard Patrick Friel on January 9, 1929 in Killyclogher, Northern Ireland. He graduated from St. Patrick's College. He spent a decade teaching mathematics in Londonderry after deciding that he did not want to become a priest. He gained confidence as a writer when his short stories began to be published in The New Yorker. He has published several volumes of short stories including A Saucer of Larks, The Gold in the Sea, and Give Me Your Answer, Do! However, he was better known for writing plays. His plays include Philadelphia, Here I Come!, The Freedom of the City, Faith Healer, Molly Sweeney, The Home Place, Translations, and Wonderful Tennessee. Aristocrats won Best Foreign Play Award from the New York Drama Critics Circle and Dancing at Lughnasa won a Tony Award for best play in 1992. He also translated several plays written by Anton Chekhov and Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev. He died on October 2, 2015 at the age of 86.

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