A Month in the Bush of Australia: Journal of One of a Party of Gentlemen who Recently Travelled from Sydney to Port Phillip : with Some Remarks on the Present State of the Farming Establishments and Society in the Settled Parts of the Argyle Country

Front Cover
Libraries Board of South Australia, 1838 - Frontier and pioneer life - 54 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 48 - They come so fast that it is impossible to provide themselves with houses, and they are living in tents and huts of all manner of shapes. Indeed no one liked to erect habitations on ground not their own, and which might so soon be brought to public sale by Government, so that the place had a most rude and motley appearance. It was high time that the lines of the town and streets were fixed, and allotments sold ; and this has been done, and 100 half-acre allotments were this day disposed of by auction....
Page 48 - ... cattle, and 80 horses, have been imported from Van Diemen's Land. During the last three months, the customs' duties have amounted to 500/. (no duty is levied on live stock), and it is calculated that there are now here a population of 800 souls. The town (in future) seems comparatively crowded with inhabitants, but without habitations.
Page 47 - The harbour accommodations of Port Philip contrast to evident disadvantage with what has been recorded of those of South Australia. The town (and we quote a friend of the colony) is on the Yarra river, just where its waters flow over a fall, and mingle with the salt water from the bar of Port Philip ; following the course of the river, it is about eight miles distant from the head of the bay of Port Philip ; but across the land not more than one and a-half. Where the vessels generally lie is called...
Page 48 - Though it is upwards of two years since the first settlers came over here with their sheep from Van Diemen's Land, and they have continued to come ever since, it is only about six or seven months, since Government have had any establishments or authority here, and within this period its growth has been most rapid. It appears by the records kept since the arrival of a commandant, comptroller of the customs, &c., that 30,353 sheep, 500 head of homed cattle, and 80 horses have been imported from Van...
Page 47 - ... not more than one and a-half. Where the vessels generally lie is called Hobson's Bay, distant by land four or five miles ; by water, ten or twelve. On the westernmost shore of that bay is another township called William's town ; but it is at present destitute of water, and no means of supply are now apparent, so that it may have that great drawback to contend against. Vessels of greater depth of water than seven or eight feet are prevented coming up to this place, called Melbourne, by a bar at...
Page 48 - I have not the least doubt, that this settlement will rise more rapidly than any in this colony was ever known to do, and that it will soon become one of the most important and flourishing districts of the colony. With so much good land in the neighbourhood of a sea-port, and with so fine a country for sheep all around it, whilst the elder colonies within any reasonable distance of the coast, are already overstocked, there is nothing can prevent its becoming populated and prosperous.
Page 49 - Mollison has erected a hut, which will be well enough when finished but in the meantime it is open and comfortless. No furniture has he, except a bench or stool, a broken cup or two, tin pannicans, a couple of knives and forks, and a plate or two. All he has to eat is Irish salted pork, damper and tea and sugar, and the light we had was produced by burning rags in pieces of fat pork.
Page 49 - ... comfortless ; no furniture has he, except a bench or stool, a broken cup or two, tin pannicans, a couple of knives and forks, and a plate or two. All he has to eat is Irish salted pork, damper and tea, and sugar ; and the light we had was produced by burning rags in pieces of the fat pork. Upon the whole, I never met with people living in a style more rude and rough, or with less attention to comfort, but to which they seem perfectly indifferent, aware it is only a temporary inconvenience.
Page 49 - Button and Brown having arrived, I preferred spending the first evening with them in our tents. As you may suppose, there is in the houses of the better classes here, a strange mixture of refinement and rudeness. There is not the least style or finish about the buildings, most of them unceiled and unplastered, &c., whilst they contain many elegant and tasteful articles of furniture.
Page 52 - I am convinced that it must rise with unprecedented rapidity, and that well-chosen portions of land, early selected, will soon increase in value.

Bibliographic information