A Movable Feast: Ten Millennia of Food Globalization

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 30, 2007 - History
3 Reviews
Pepper was once worth its weight in gold. Onions have been used to cure everything from sore throats to foot fungus. White bread was once considered too nutritious. From hunting water buffalo to farming salmon, A Movable Feast chronicles the globalization of food over the past ten thousand years. This engaging history follows the path that food has taken throughout history and the ways in which humans have altered its course. Beginning with the days of hunter-gatherers and extending to the present world of genetically modified chickens, Kenneth F. Kiple details the far-reaching adventure of food. He investigates food's global impact, from the Irish potato famine to the birth of McDonald's. Combining fascinating facts with historical evidence, this is a sweeping narrative of food's place in the world. Looking closely at geographic, cultural and scientific factors, this book reveals how what we eat has transformed over the years from fuel to art.
 

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User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

A history of the animals, plants, and processes that make up our food, from the dawn of civilization into modernity. There's some interesting information in here, but it's hidden in what are basically ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Shrike58 - LibraryThing

Essentially a distillation of the "Cambridge World History of Food," the author traces the paths by which the modern cuisines of the world came to be, and the attendant health and social issues that ... Read full review

Contents

NEW FOODS IN THE
127
THE COLUMBIAN
135
Europes people had increased to 266 million by 1850 and
144
THE COLUMBIAN
150
SUGAR AND NEW
163
caffeine Three ingredients predominated for the nonalcoholic drinks
166
is rocket science And with espresso came a
170
battles British armies ceased fire for tea at five oclock60
178

PROMISCUOUS PLANTS
25
famous sage Pythagoras along with Greek physicians warned against them
32
Cheese making radiated out of western Iran where some claim
35
PERIPATETIC PLANTS
36
The question of whether bananas reached the New World before
38
Africa Around 714 AD taro was taken to Iberia by
39
arose in a north that regarded the south as primitive
43
rice grew enormously and an already thriving trade in rice
45
rice57 Another side dish was a form of sushi
50
FECUND FRINGES OF
51
CONSEQUENCES OF
61
until Roman times its most important use was probably for
64
ENTERPRISE AND
70
being enclosed although both were raised for the table in
82
FAITH AND FOODSTUFFS
83
EMPIRES IN THE
91
MEDIEVAL PROGRESS
97
SPAINS NEW WORLD
105
NEW WORLD
113
Developing countries initially imported them but then through
181
KITCHEN
184
available in Lima18 Nonetheless in a land where Quechua is
188
like hominy and pork soup or mole poblano require European
189
PRODUCING PLENTY
191
Day Adventist Church the Kellogg brothers and C W Post
201
THE FRONTIERS OF
202
And finally housewives as their grandmothers before them blended
213
CAPITALISM
214
HOMEMADE FOOD
226
Meanwhile home cooks turned for exotica to supermarket shelves lined
237
NOTIONS OF NUTRIENTS
238
vitamin C and with this discovery many scurvy riddles were
245
Iodine Deficiency Disorders founded in 1986 has been coordinating and
251
THE PERILS OF PLENTY
253
THE GLOBALIZATION
267
FAST FOOD A HYMN
274
PARLOUS PLENTY
285
PEOPLE AND PLENTY
295

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Page 14 - There is in every animal's eye a dim image and gleam of humanity, a flash of strange light through which their life looks out and up to our great mystery of command over them, and claims the fellowship of the creature if not of the soul

About the author (2007)

Kenneth F. Kiple is a Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. His edited collections include The Cambridge Historical Dictionary of Disease (2003); The Cambridge World History of Food (2000, with Kriemhild Conee Ornelas); Biological Consequences of European Expansion 1450–1800 (1997, with Stephen V. Beck); Plague, Pox, and Pestilence: Disease in History (1997); The Cambridge History of World Disease (1993); and The African Exchange: Toward a Biological History of Black People (1987). Kiple is author of The Caribbean Slave: A Biological History (1984); Another Dimension to the Black Diaspora: Diet, Disease, and Racism (1981); and Blacks in Colonial Cuba 1774–1899 (1976, with Virginia Himmelsteib King). His considerable body of written works also includes numerous articles and essays in scholarly journals and books. His work has been supported with grants and fellowships from institutions including the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society and the National Institutes of Health.

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