A Natural History of Amphibians

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Princeton University Press, 1995 - Nature - 316 pages
2 Reviews

This is a book for all readers who want to learn about amphibians, the animal group that includes frogs, toads, salamanders, and caecilians. It draws on many years of classroom teaching, laboratory experience, and field observation by the authors. Robert Stebbins and Nathan Cohen lead readers on a fascinating odyssey as they explore some of nature's most interesting creatures, interspersing their own observations throughout the book. A Natural History of Amphibians can serve as a textbook for students and independent learners, as an overview of the field for professional scientists and land managers, and as an engaging introduction for general readers.

The class Amphibia contains more than 4,500 known living species. New species are being discovered so rapidly that the number may grow to more than 5,000 during our lifetimes. However, their numbers are being rapidly decimated around the globe, largely due to the encroachment of humans on amphibian habitats and from growing human-caused environmental pollution, discussed at length in the final chapter. The authors focus our attention on the "natural history" of amphibians worldwide and emphasize their interactions with their environments over time: where they live; how they reproduce; how they have been affected by evolutionary processes; what factors will determine their destinies over time. Through the experienced eyes of the authors, who are skilled observers, we come to see and understand the place of amphibians in the natural world around us.

 

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Copyright

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Page 271 - Hews, DK (1988). Alarm response in larval western toads, Bufo boreas: release of larval chemicals by a natural predator and its effect on predator capture efficiency. Anim. Behav., 36, 125-33.
Page 271 - Heyer, WR 1973. Ecological interactions of frog larvae at a seasonal tropical location in Thailand. J.
Page 281 - Effects of progesterone on sexual attractivity in female rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa. Copeia 1978, 530-532. Moore, FL, and Muller, CH (1977).
Page 258 - Brodie, ED, Jr., DR Formanowicz, Jr., and ED Brodie, III, 1978. The development of noxiousness of Bufo americanus tadpoles to aquatic insect predators. Herpetologica, 34: 302-306.
Page 281 - JW 1976. Preliminary evaluation of skin toxins and vocalizations in taxonomic and evolutionary studies of poison-dart frogs (Dendrobatidae). Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist.
Page 277 - Lombard RE (1977) Comparative morphology of the inner ear in salamanders (Caudata; Amphibia). Contrib Vert Evol 2:1-140. Lombard RE (1980) The structure of the amphibian auditory periphery: a unique experiment in terrestrial hearing.
Page 278 - Lombard, RE, and DB Wake (1976) Tongue evolution in the lungless salamanders, Family Plethodontidae. I. Introduction, theory and a general model of dynamics. J.
Page 277 - HB 1971. Thermal modulation of cutaneous mucus discharge as a determinant of evaporative water loss in the frog, Rana catesbeiana. Z.
Page 276 - Breeding Habits and Embryonic Thermal Requirements of the Frogs, Rana aurora aurora and Rana pretiosa pretiosa, in the Pacific Northwest, Ecology 52: 116-124. Linder G., Woodward DF, and Pascoe G., 2002. "Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment for Aquatic, Wetland, and Terrestrial Habitats Along the Clark Fork River, Montana," In Hoffman DJ, Rattner BA, Burton Jr.
Page 278 - Schreber, in Northern Michigan. Ecology 46: 236-255. 27. SHOOP, CR 1965. Orientation of Ambystoma maculatum: Movements to and from breeding ponds. Science 149: 558-559. 28. MADISON, DM & CR SHOOP. 1970. Homing behavior, orientation and home range of salamanders tagged with tantalum-182. Science 168: 1484-1487. 29. FERGUSON, DE 1967. Sun-compass orientation in anurans, p. 21 to 34. In RM Storm, Ed. Animal orientation and navigation. Oregon State Univ. Press, Corvallis, Oregon. 30. ADLER, HE 1970....

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About the author (1995)

Robert C. Stebbins is Professor Emeritus of Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley and a curator emeritus of the University's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. The author of over a dozen books, his latest work is "Connecting with Nature: A Naturalist's Perspective." Samuel M. McGinnis is Professor Emeritus of Biology at California State University, East Bay. He is the author of another California Natural History guide, "Freshwater Fishes of California

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