A New History of Violin Playing: The Vibrato and Lambert Massart's Revolutionary Discovery

Front Cover
Universal-Publishers, 2001 - History - 433 pages
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An in depth study of the most superlative violin performers and teachers in history. The result of more than eleven years of deep investigation on the subject, this New History is by far the best available in the 21st century. It studies specifically the vibrato and its evolution. A study of the main violin schools of the world, with special emphasis in their evolution, and the direct conexión teacher-pupil. In the course of this history we will see how the great performers became, often, the great masters of new great violinists, who, in their turn, became the teachers of new superlative performers, and so on, in an uninterrupted chain of teacher-pupil intercommunication, the interrelation of whom is carefully studied, to higlight the evolution of the main violin playing schools. For each violinist we give a list of all the valuable instruments they owned and played, i.e. Stradivarius, Guarneri del Gesu, etc.. Such a complete and interesting information is not available in any other history. Contains a list of cassettes we have gathered for the better understanding of our players. Designed to be easily read by everyone, it has not complicated esoteric terms, but is written in plain words that everybody will understand. There is no need to be a professional musican to enjoy it. All you need to be is a music lover. But the main novelty is the sensational discovery of the real founder of the modern-vibrato violin school, with all kind of evidence, even written authentic letters that attest to it. This violinst is unknown in the present time. Contains very useful graphs of all the main schools, for an easy understanding of their evolution. Contains an encyclopaedia of all terms and names of the book that are not sufficently explained in it. Here the reader will be acquainted with the meaning of many musical terms that, although well know to musicians, are not so much known to others, who not being musicians, are, nevertheless, music lovers. But the encyclopaedia contains much more than that: men of letters, politicians, personalities, singers, pianists, composers, painters, etc. are duly explained in it. Done with loving care it sometimes surpasses its parent the book. Contains five sensational, unpublished, autographed letters by Kreisler, that will make readers tremble, plus the contentent of many other unpublished ones, by the most important musicians of the second half of the XIX century. Contains a series of very captivating collateral disquisitions on Modern abstract art; composer versus interpreter; the use of ornamentation; the easiness to reed music; Ingres and his violi; lisztomania and others. In a word, this "New history" is new because: It studies in depth the vibrato and its evolution. Links teachers to pupils, who become teacher in their turn, in a comprehensive general outlook of schools' evolution. It provides us with the list of all the valuable instruments of all our fiddlers. Contains a list of recommended cassettes, as musical examples. Easy to understand by every one, it avoids esoteric, pedantic terminology, and is written in plain laguage. It discovers, for the first time in history, the true founder of the vibrato, with all sort of evidence. With useful graphs of the main schools. Contains an encyclopaedia, which no other book of the genre has. The autographed unpublished letters of Kreisler will give the creeps to the reader. Contains a series of disquisitions on ornamentations; easiness to read music; composer versus interpreter; abstracat art; Ingres and his violin; Lisztomania and others, plus abundant, moving, anecdotes that distract and relax the attention of the reader.
 

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ml gl
pour harmoniques ....

Contents

II
15
III
17
IV
18
V
20
VI
23
VII
26
VIII
30
IX
32
LXXVIII
167
LXXIX
171
LXXX
172
LXXXI
175
LXXXII
177
LXXXIII
178
LXXXIV
179
LXXXV
181

X
33
XIII
37
XIV
38
XV
39
XVI
42
XVII
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XVIII
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XX
48
XXI
50
XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVII
70
XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
81
XXXVI
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XXXVII
83
XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
87
XLI
93
XLII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
99
XLVIII
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XLIX
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LI
107
LII
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LIII
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LIV
114
LV
126
LVII
129
LVIII
132
LIX
133
LX
134
LXI
135
LXIII
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
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LXXII
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LXXIII
148
LXXIV
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LXXV
157
LXXVI
158
LXXVII
163
LXXXVI
182
LXXXVII
184
LXXXVIII
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LXXXIX
187
XCI
192
XCII
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XCIII
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XCIV
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XCV
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XCVI
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XCVII
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XCVIII
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XCIX
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C
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CI
212
CII
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CIII
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CIV
215
CV
217
CVI
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CVII
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CVIII
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CIX
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CX
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CXI
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CXII
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CXIII
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CXIV
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CXV
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CXVI
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CXVII
241
CXVIII
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CXX
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CXXI
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CXXII
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CXXIII
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CXXIV
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CXXV
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CXXVI
258
CXXVIII
260
CXXIX
262
CXXXI
263
CXXXII
265
CXXXIII
266
CXXXIV
269
CXXXV
271
CXXXVI
272
CXXXVII
274
CXXXVIII
278
CXXXIX
287
CXL
302
CXLI
305
CXLII
308
CXLIII
398
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Popular passages

Page 41 - Re" comminciamo," — (let us begin again) said Scarlatti, good-naturedly. Still Corelli persisted in the major key, till Scarlatti was obliged to call out to him, and set him right. So mortified was poor Corelli...
Page 40 - ... rehearsal. At length, however, he consented; and in great fear performed the first of his concertos. His astonishment was very great to find that the Neapolitan band executed his concertos almost as accurately at sight, as his own band, after repeated rehearsals, when they had almost got them by heart. "Si 40 suona, (says he to Matteo, his second violin) a Napoli".
Page 40 - Scarlatti, and several other masters, who entreated him to play some of his concertos before the king. This he for some time declined, on account of his whole band not being with him ; and there was no time, he said, for a rehearsal. At length, however, he consented...
Page 16 - ... The pair were caught by a storm in the Bay of Biscay. The ship rolled; Tarisio clasped his bass tight and trembled. It was a terrible gale, and for one whole day they were in real danger. Tarisio spoke of it to me with a shudder. I will give you his real words, for they struck me at the time, and I have often thought of them since: " Ah, my poor Mr. Reade, the bass of Spain was all but lost.
Page 57 - To perform it, you must press the finger strongly upon the string of the instrument, and move the wrist in and out slowly and equally. When it is long continued, swelling the sound by degrees, drawing the bow nearer to the bridge, and ending it very strong, it may express majesty, dignity, &c.
Page 39 - At the time of Corelli's greatest reputation, Geminiani asked Scarlatti what he thought of him, who answered, that " he found nothing greatly to admire in his composition, but was extremely struck with the manner in which he played his concertos, and his nice management of his band, the uncommon accuracy of whose performance gave the concertos an amazing effect, even to the eye as well as to the ear.
Page 53 - Audience, to be first inspired himself; which he cannot fail to be if he chooses a Work of Genius, if he makes himself thoroughly acquainted with all its Beauties; and if while his Imagination is warm and glowing he pours the same exalted Spirit into his own Performance.

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