A New Mexico David: And Other Stories and Sketches of the Southwest

Front Cover
C. Scribner's sons, 1891 - New Mexico - 217 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 190 - These sticks are four to five inches long, about an inch wide, and a quarter of an inch thick ; and must have their sides flat, so that the three may be clasped together very much as one holds a pen, but more nearly perpendicular, with the thumb and first three fingers of the right hand. Each stick is plain on one side and marked on the other, generally with diagonal notches, as shown in the illustration.
Page 39 - Let all go forth, that we build shelters of cedar and stay in the fields. The women, also, to cook for us. Take ye, each one, food for a month. And pray that the Sun-Father, Pa-yat-yama, give us much corn this year.” As white-headed Kai-a-tan-ish passed deliberately down in front of the houses, the soft Queres words rolling sonorously from his deep throat, the people stopped their work to listen to him. The ruddy sun was just resting over the cliffs of the Black Mesa, which walled the pretty valley...
Page 51 - A moment's breathing spell and he was dashing down the long sand-hill and then away up the valley. The fields were eight miles away. Would his strength last, sorely tried as it had been? He did not know ; but he pressed his hand against his bleeding side and ran on. Suddenly he felt the ground quiver beneath his feet. A strange, rushing sound filled his ears; and, whirling about, he saw the great Ladder Rock rear, throw its head out from the cliff, reel there an instant in mid-air, and then go toppling...
Page 42 - A-chi-te started homeward, running like a deer. He was fifteen years old, tall for his age, clean-limbed and deep-chested. His heavy black hair was cut straight above his big, black eyes, and behind fell below his shoulders. He had the massive but clear-cut features...
Page 44 - Sha^u>a~ts6sh!" from lungs as mighty as those of Montezuma. In half an hour the long procession had melted into the brown bosom of the valley; and even A'-chi-te's keen eyes could distinguish it no longer. He drew a deep breath, threw back his square young shoulders, and walked away to his mother's house. Alone with three sick women, the only man in Acoma — no wonder the boy's head was carried even straighter than usual. Truly, this was better than going to the planting. All the boys had gone there,...
Page 190 - When the players have seated themselves, the first takes the pa-tol sticks tightly in his right hand, lifts them about as high as his chin, and, bringing them down with a smart vertical thrust, as if to harpoon the center stone, lets go of them when they are within some C inches of it.
Page 40 - ... the town. Such quaint houses as they were! Built of gray adobe, terraced so that the three successive stories receded like a gigantic flight of steps, they stood in three parallel rows, each a continuous block a thousand feet long, divided by interior walls into wee but comfortable tenements. There were no doors nor windows in the lower story, but tall ladders reached to the roof, which formed a sort of broad piazza before the secondstory door. Women were washing their hair with the soapy root...
Page 40 - Children ran races along the smooth rock which served for a street, or cared for their mothers' babies slung upon their patient young backs. The men were very busy, tying up bundles in buckskin, putting new handles on their stone axes and hoes, or fitting to damaged arrows new heads shaped from pieces of quartz or volcanic glass. As the Governor kept his measured way down the street, repeating his proclamation at intervals, a tall, powerfully made Indian stepped from one of the houses, descended...
Page 50 - ... crept down, down, fighting the fierce water, clinging to the tiny toe-holes. Once he stopped. He was sure that he felt the rock tremble, and then despised himself for the thought. The great Ladder Rock tremble! Why, it was as solid as the mighty mesa! It was half an hour before he reached the bottom of the rock; and when he looked downward, over his shoulder, he cried out aghast. The cataract had had its way with the great hill of fine sand on which the base of the rock rested; and where the...
Page 51 - Suddenly he felt the ground quiver beneath his feet. A strange, rushing sound filled his ears; and, whirling about, he saw the great Ladder Rock rear, throw its head out from the cliff, reel there an instant in mid-air, and then go toppling out into the plain like some wounded Titan. As those thousands of tons of rock smote upon the solid earth with a hideous roar, a great cloud went up, and the valley seemed to rock to and fro. From the face of the cliffs, three miles away, great rocks came leaping...

Bibliographic information