A New Voyage Round the World, Volume 1

Front Cover
J. Knapton, 1699 - Buccaneers
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

trfyuhjikpooijygtfrd t54y657ju6y 5y6565 65 65 u65ui756543546uo 985htgt4h6j7k8 9lk86j5h y5 j76uk79 6juy 5b numi,oi7m6nu 5by numki7 k76ju hy

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 56 - Pines, we stick our Knives into the Leaves just above the Root, and that lets out the Water, which we catch in our Hats, as I have done many times to my great Relief.
Page 127 - Aspect is altogether graceful. They are nimble People, but very lazy : which probably is for want of Commerce. Their chief employment is Husbandry. They have a great many Bulls and Cows, which they carefully look after ; for every Man knows his own, though they run all promiscuously together in their Savannahs ; yet they have Pens near their own Houses, where they make them gentle and bring them to the Pail. They also plant Corn and fence in their Fields to keep out all Cattle as well tame as wild.
Page 127 - Trade- Winds, Breezes, Storms, Seasons of the Year, Tides and Currents of the Torrid Zone throughout the World : With an Account of Natal in Africk, its Product, Negroe's &c.
Page 127 - Indian ocean, in lat. 30. south. There it opens pretty wide, and is deep enough for small vessels* But at the mouth of the river is a bar, which has not above ten or eleven feet of water on it in a spring tide, though within there is water enough.
Page 127 - Then the land-winds, whose office it is to breathe in the night, moved by the same order of divine impulse, do rouse out of their private recesses, and gently fan the air till the next morning, and then their task ends, and they leave the stage.
Page 127 - ... is as smooth and even as Glass in Comparison; in half an Hour's time after it has reached the shore it fans pretty briskly, and so increaseth gradually till 12 a Clock, then it is commonly strongest, and lasts so till 2 or 3 a very brisk gale; about 12 at Noon it also veers off to Sea 2 or 3 Points, or more in very fair Weather.
Page 127 - They had gained the Language of the Country : and the Natives freely gave them Wives and Cows too. They were beloved by all the People, and so much reverenced that their Words were taken as Laws. And when they came away, many of the Boys cried because they would not take them with them.
Page 2 - My friends did not originally design me for the sea, but bred me at school till I came to years fit for a trade. But upon the death of my father and mother, they who had the disposal of me took other measures ; and having...
Page 80 - Cutters are generally sturdy strong Fellows, and will carry Burthens of three or four hundred Weight ; but every Man is left to his choice to carry what he pleaseth, and commonly they agree very well about it : For they are contented to labour very hard. But when Ships come from Jamaica with Rum and Sugar, they are too apt to mispend both their Time and Money.
Page 175 - These were immediately drest for Supper, and the Boat was sent out again to get more for Mr. Richards and his Lady to carry aboard with them. In the mean time the Food was brought into the Dining-Room, and placed on the Table. The Dishes and Plates were of Silver, and there was a Silver Punch-Bowl full of Liquor. The Governour, his Guests and some of his Officers were seated, but just as they began to fall to, one of the Soldiers cried out Malayans...

Bibliographic information