A Non-Violent Resistance Approach with Children in Distress: A Guide for Parents and Professionals

Front Cover
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Dec 15, 2009 - Family & Relationships - 192 pages
0 Reviews
Parents, teachers and other professionals often struggle to know how to deal with disruptive, abusive or aggressive behaviour. This book addresses the urgent need for a realistic, practical and effective approach to dealing with severe disruptive behaviour in children and adolescents. Adapting the principles of non-violent resistance originally advocated by Mahatma Gandhi, the book provides de-escalation techniques which empower the adult and unburden the distressed child. The authors outline the theoretical basis upon which the approach was developed, and explain how and why it can be so effective. Case studies demonstrate how the approach can be used to reach more successful places with unhappy and disruptive children of different ages. A separate section for parents provides useful advice on how to take the theoretical material and use it to deal with problematic behaviour in everyday life. As effective as it is original, this approach will empower desperate parents and despairing caregivers by equipping them with hands-on tools to contain, counter and positively direct the aggression and opposition which they face from children in distress.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
7
The Politics of Family Conflict
9
An Ecological Approach
13
The NonViolent Resistance Model
33
From Theory to Practice The Intervention
43
A Young Child with SelfDestructive Behaviour
48
A Barricaded Teenager
62
A Teen at Risk
80
Family and Community
109
The Child the Parent and the School
128
The Model of NonViolent Resistance A Guidebook for Parents
142
Overview
174
References
185
Index
188
BACK COVER
194
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Dr. Carmelite Avraham-Krehwinkel is an affiliate researcher at the Nordoff Robbins Centre in Witten, Germany. She has many years of experience in child, adolescent and family psychotherapy, and specialises in working with children with behavioural problems. David Aldridge is co-director of the Nordoff Robbins Centre in Witten, Germany. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and co-editor of the interdisciplinary journal "Music and Medicine".

Bibliographic information