A Pali Grammar for Students

Front Cover
Silkworm Books, 2006 - Foreign Language Study - 203 pages
0 Reviews
This book is intended for modern students, inside or outside the classroom, as a work of reference rather than a "teach yourself" textbook. It presents an introductory sketch of Pali using both European and South Asian grammatical categories. In English-language works, Pali is usually presented in the traditional terms of English grammar, derived from the classical tradition, with which many modern students are unfamiliar. This work discusses and reflects upon those categories, and has an appendix devoted to them. It also introduces the main categories of traditional Sanskrit and Pali grammar, drawing on, in particular, the medieval Pali text Saddaniti, by Aggavamsa. Each grammatical form is illustrated by examples taken from Pali texts, mostly canonical. Although some previous knowledge of Sanskrit would be helpful, the book can also be used by those without previous linguistic training. A bibliographical appendix refers to other, complementary resources. Steven Collins is professor of South Asian languages and civilizations at the University of Chicago, and was formerly a council member of the Pali Text Society (London). He is the author of Selfless Persons: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism and Nirvana and Other Buddhist Felicities: Utopias of the Pali Imaginaire.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

ndma Nouns Adjectives Pronouns and Pronominal Adjectives Numerals
17
dkhydta Verbs
75
nipdta Particles Adverbs
121
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Steven Collins is Chester D. Tripp Professor in the Humanities at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Nirvana and Other Buddhist Felicities: Imagery and Thought in Theravada Buddhism (Cambridge, 1998).

Bibliographic information