A Parent's Guide to Special Education: Insider Advice on how to Navigate the System and Help Your Child Succeed

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AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn, 2005 - Family & Relationships - 262 pages
3 Reviews

"The term 'special education' encompasses dozens of learning challenges: developmental delay, learning and physical disabilities, emotional disturbance, retardation, language impairment, autism, and others. By nature of this diversity, navigating even well-run, well-funded special education programs can be daunting. A Parent's Guide to Special Education offers guidance to parents and their children -- as well as to teachers, counselors, and administrators -- on issues including:

* diagnosis and awareness * special education laws * eligibility issues and requirements * programs * parenting issues * communication between parents and schools * and much more

A Parent's Guide to Special Education offers invaluable information and a positive vision of special education that will help them through a potentially overwhelming process. Filled with practical recommendations, sample forms, and enlightening examples, this is a priceless resource for helping every child learn."

 

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Great book

User Review  - Overstock.com

I have used this book since January and have loved it! The information has helped me to advocate for things for my child that I did not know he legally deserved. My husband and I read it from cover to cover and still refer back to it on a regular basis. Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

The one reviewer is incorrect. He/she wrote: "For example, the "Did You Know" on page 20, states that from the date the Informed Consent is signed, the district has 60 days to complete an eval AND hold the conference to review the results. Actually, it is 60 days to complete the eval and up to 30 days additionally to schedule and hold the conference."
This is not true at all. I have worked as a special education advocate in three states. In all of those states, the school system has 60 days to complete the evaluation and hold a meeting to review the results. The additional 30 days referenced by the reviewer is for the development on an Individualized Education Program (IEP); this meeting is separate from the eligibility meeting.
I have attended more than 800 eligibility meetings and IEP meetings. I have not found anything inaccurate about the book and always recommend it to parents (I usually buy in bulk and sell them individual copies if they want a copy). It seems that the reviewer is misinformed about the differences between an eligibility and IEP meeting.
Jason Williams
 

Contents

V
11
VI
25
VIII
35
IX
43
X
45
XI
58
XII
75
XIII
87
XIX
143
XX
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XXI
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XIV
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XVII
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XVIII
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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About the author (2005)

"Linda Wilmshurst (Eustis, FL) is a Diplomate in Clinical Psychology (American Board of Professional Psychology) and is currently a Licensed School Psychologist in Florida . She has more than 30 years of clinical and school psychology experience and has taught in clinical and school psychology programs in universities, internationally.

Alan Brue (Bethesda, MD) is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist and Director of Professional Standards for the National Association of School Psychologists, and has also worked as a school psychologist and university trainer."

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