A Pedagogy for Liberation: Dialogues on Transforming Education

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Bergin & Garvey Publishers, 1987 - Education - 203 pages
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… one of the most important books for American teachers. . . . If you teach, read it on one of the days when you want to quit. You'll either keep teaching or quit with a clearer head. Democratic SchoolS≪/i>

Highly recommended. . . . Written in a rather interesting manner--primarily as a conversation--this book serves nicely as an informal yet rigorous treatment of critical pedagogy. There is a satisfactory blend of theoretical investigation and practical personal anecdote. . . . The text is well researched. Choice

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Contents

How Can Teachers Become Liberating
17
Resistance and Support
24
Teachers Learn
30
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Paulo Freire is one of the most widely read educational philosophers and practitioners in the world today, except in the United States, where he remains relatively unknown to many in the educational community as well as the general public. Freire received international acclaim and notoriety with his first and best-known work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, first published in English in 1970. His teachings draw much of their inspiration from a Marxist critique of society; for this reason he was forced into exile from his native Brazil in 1964, and his works were banned in many developing nations. His pedagogy for adult literacy has been implemented successfully in several African nations and has been the basis for literacy crusades in Nicaragua and other Latin American countries. His philosophical approach to education forms the basis for much of the critical theory work in education now taking place in the United States, Europe, and developing nations.

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