A Pelican at Blandings

Front Cover
Random House, 2008 - Blandings Castle (England : Imaginary place) - 256 pages
3 Reviews

A Blandings novel

Unwelcome guests are descending on Blandings Castle - particularly the overbearing Duke of Dunstable, who settles in the Garden Suite with no intention of leaving, and Lady Constance, Lord Emsworth's sister and a lady of firm disposition, who arrives unexpectedly from New York. Skulduggery is also afoot involving the sale of a modern nude painting (mistaken by Lord Emsworth for a pig). It's enough to take the noble earl on the short journey to the end of his wits.

Luckily Clarence's brother Galahad Threepwood, cheery survivor of the raffish Pelican Club, is on hand to set things right, restore sundered lovers and even solve all the mysteries.

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ameise1 - LibraryThing

Well, this was a light listening which didn't quite caught my interest. There was much fuss about fraud in painting forgery, names and titles, and money scams. Sometimes it was funny at times rather boring. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jiraiya - LibraryThing

Whether Shropshire is fictional or purely not, I'm not going there ever again - figuratively. The goalposts have moved. I think Wodehouse will be one of the first big names that no one remembers in ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2008)

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (always known as 'Plum') wrote more than ninety novels and some three hundred short stories over 73 years. He is widely recognised as the greatest 20th-century writer of humour in the English language.

Perhaps best known for the escapades of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse also created the world of Blandings Castle, home to Lord Emsworth and his cherished pig, the Empress of Blandings. His stories include gems concerning the irrepressible and disreputable Ukridge; Psmith, the elegant socialist; the ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred; and those related by Mr Mulliner, the charming raconteur of The Angler's Rest, and the Oldest Member at the Golf Club.

In 1936 he was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for 'having made an outstanding and lasting contribution to the happiness of the world'. He was made a Doctor of Letters by Oxford University in 1939 and in 1975, aged 93, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died shortly afterwards, on St Valentine's Day.

Bibliographic information