A Philosophy of Hope: Josef Pieper and the Contemporary Debate on Hope

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Fordham Univ Press, 2003 - Philosophy - 317 pages
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Josef Pieper was one of this century's most influential thinkers. A leading Catholic philosopher, he won a wide audience through such books as The Four Cardinal Virtues and About Love. This book is one of few extended studies of Pieper's thought-in particular, of the concept of hope. Pieper was one of the first modern philosophers to explore the idea of hope, and Schumacher discusses his development alongside contributions by Sartre, Jaspers, Marcel, Heidegger, Bloch, and other thinkers. He examines Pieper's treatment of hope as an aspect of individual potential and as an historical force, exploring such themes as dignity, ethics, the good, and the just.
 

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Contents

THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL AND ONTOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN HOPE
11
2 The question of happiness
34
3 The human being in via
39
CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN HOPE
64
2 Other characteristics of human hope
66
3 The structure of hope inherent in philosophy and reason
85
THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN ORDINARY AND FUNDAMENTAL HOPE
97
2 Limitsituations as occasions for the manifestation of fundamental hope
99
2 The grounds for fundamental hope in the face of death
157
3 The incorruptibility of the human being
167
The principle of hope in the face of the antiutopia of death
172
5 A comparison of Piepers and Blochs positions
177
HOPE AND HISTORY
203
2 The philosophy of history
206
3 The philosophy of progress
212
Despair and history
228

3 The different objects of ordinary and fundamental hope
102
4 Ordinary hope
105
5 Fundamental hope and the theological virtue of hope
111
THE EXTREME OPPOSITES OF HOPE PRESUMPTION AND DESPAIR
135
2 Despair
136
DEATH AS THE ENEMY OF HOPE
153
5 Piepers hope and the end of history
232
Conclusion
253
Bibliography
259
Index
305
Copyright

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Page 27 - of finding values in a heaven of ideas disappears along with Him; there can no longer be an a priori Good, since there is no infinite and perfect consciousness to thInk it. Nowhere is it written that the Good exists, that we must be honest, that we must not lie; because the
Page 25 - Not only is man what he conceives himself to be, but he Is also only what he wills himself to be after this thrust toward existence. Man is nothing else but what he makes of himself. . . . Man is at the start a plan.
Page 20 - Let us consider some object that is manufactured, for example a book or a paper-cutter: here is an object which has been made by an artisan whose inspiration came from a concept He referred to the concept of what a paper-cutter is and likewise to a known method of production, which is
Page 21 - if a house, eg, had been a thing made by nature, it would have been made in the same way as it is now by art, and If things made by nature were made also by art, they would come to be in the same way as by nature.”
Page 22 - Thus, the concept of man in the mind of God is comparable to the concept of paper-cutter In the mind of the manufacturer, and, following certain techniques and a conception, God produces man, just as the artisan, following a definition and a technique, makes a paper-cutter. Thus, the individual man is the realization of a certain concept in the divine

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About the author (2003)


Bernard Schumacher teaches at the University of Fribourg; he is co-editor of The Classics of Western Philosophy.

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