A Police Force Without a State: A History of the Palestinian Security Forces in the West Bank and Gaza

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Ithaca Press, 2006 - History - 477 pages
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This book traces the evolution of the Palestinian police and security forces, beginning with its historical antecedents in Lebanon and the Occupied Territories, and the formation of formal police organizations after the Oslo Accords until the outbreak of the second Intifada in September 2000. The history of the Palestinian police revolves around the fundamental question of how a national police force can be created and operated without the framework of an independent state. Offering a far more detailed and accurate account of the Palestinian police history, this study also provides unique insight into the problems and dilemmas of policing by non-state actors in war torn societies. The study traces the establishment and expansion of the Palestinian police and security forces with a focus on PLO efforts at recruiting, training, and expanding the force, its political context, institutional development, and dilemmas of 'non-state' policing in the context of the political-military conflict with Israel. A Police Force without a State gives a unique insight into a hitherto uncharted territory in contemporary Palestinian and Middle Eastern history.

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About the author (2006)

Dr Brynjar Lia is a Research Professor at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment in Kjeller, Norway. He was a Visiting Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University in 2001-2. Lia is the author of Building Arafat's Police: The Politics of International Police Assistance in the Palestinian Territories after the Oslo Agreement (Ithaca Press, 2005) and The Society of the Muslim Brothers in Egypt: The Rise of an Islamic Mass Movement 1928-42 (Ithaca, 1998).

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