A Political Theology of Nature

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 6, 2003 - Philosophy - 275 pages
0 Reviews
This book argues that the modern separation of humanity from nature can be traced to the displacement of the triune God. Locating the source of our current ecological crisis in this separation, Peter Scott argues that it can only be healed within theology, through a revival of a Trinitarian doctrine of creation interacting with political philosophies of ecology. Drawing insights from deep ecology, ecofeminism, and social and socialist ecologies, Scott proposes a common realm of God, nature and humanity. Both Trinitarian and political, the theology of this common realm is worked out by reference to Christ and Spirit. Christ's resurrection is presented as the liberation and renewal of ecological relations in nature and society, the movement of the Holy Spirit is understood as the renewal of fellowship between humanity and nature through ecological democracy, and the Eucharist is proposed as the principal political resource Christianity offers for an ecological age.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Nature in Christian theology politics context and concepts
3
The common realm of God nature and humanity
30
Deep ecology the return of nature
63
Ecofeminism the reproduction of nature
89
Social ecology the dialectical emergence of nature and society
109
Socialist ecology the production of nature
136
The worldly Christ common nature
169
Life in the Spirit unnatural fellowship
201
Godbodyunnatural relations unnatural community in Jesus Christ
233
Bibliography
259
Index
271
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

PETER SCOTT is Lecturer in Theology in the Department of Theology & Religious Studies at the University of Gloucestershire.

Bibliographic information