A Prefect's Uncle

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Aug 1, 2010 - Fiction - 218 pages
5 Reviews
Long before British humor master P.G. Wodehouse created the popular novel series based on the much-beloved character Jeeves, he sent up his native country's private school culture in A Prefect's Uncle. When the mischievous prankster Farnie arrives on campus of tony Beckford College and his shocking true identity is revealed, much hilarity ensues.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

Simply God-Awful. All British boy's schools and cricket matches and pip pip cheerio crap. His earlier works were bad, but it's still interesting to see the progression. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - PhilSyphe - LibraryThing

“A Prefect's Uncle” was P. G. Wodehouse’s second publication and was first released in 1903. This isn’t a novel with a single plot featuring a hero and a heroine – in fact no female characters appear ... Read full review

Contents

1 Term Begins
5
2 Introduces an Unusual Uncle
19
3 The Uncle Makes Himself at Home
29
4 Pringle Makes a Sporting Offer
43
5 Farnie Gets into Trouble
55
6 And Stays There
66
7 The Bishop Goes for a Ride
79
8 The MCC Match
88
11 Poetry and StumpCricket
125
12 We the Undersigned
135
13 Leicesters House Team Goes into a Second Edition
147
14 Norris Takes a Short Holiday
159
15 Versus Charchester at Charchester
173
16 A Disputed Authorship
184
17 The Winter Term
197
18 The Bishop Scores
208

9 The Bishop Finishes His Ride
102
10 In Which a Case is Fully Discussed
113

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About the author (2010)

P. G. Wodehouse was born in Guildford, United Kingdom on October 15, 1881. After completing school, he spent two years as a banker at the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London and then took a job as a sports reporter and columnist for the Globe newspaper. His first novel, The Pothunters, was published in 1902. He wrote over 100 novels and short story collections during his lifetime including A Perfect Uncle, Love Among the Chickens, The Swoop, P. Smith in the City, Meet Mr. Milliner, Doctor Sally, Quick Service, The Old Reliable, Uneasy Money, A Damsel in Distress, Jill the Reckless, The Adventures of Sally, A Pelican at Blandings, The Girl in Blue, and Aunts Aren't Gentlemen. His most famous characters, Bertie Wooster and his manservant, Jeeves, appeared in books such as Much Obliged, Jeeves. He also wrote lyrics for musical comedies and worked as screenwriter in Hollywood in the 1930s. In 1939, he bought a villa in Le Touquet on the coast of France. He remained there when World War II started in 1939. The following year, the Germans appropriated the villa, confiscated property, and arrested him. He was detained in various German camps for almost one year before being released in 1941. He went to Berlin and spoke of his experience in five radio talks to be broadcast to America and England. The talks themselves were completely innocuous, but he was charged with treason in England. He was cleared, but settled permanently in the United States. He became a citizen in 1955. He was made a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1975. He died from a heart attack after a long illness on February 14, 1975 at the age of 93.

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