A Preliminary Analysis of the October 1, 1965 Coup in Indonesia

Front Cover
Equinox Publishing, 2009 - History - 220 pages
0 Reviews
Although numerous accounts have been published of the genesis and character of the attempted October 1965 coup in Indonesia, many important aspects of that affair still remain very unclear. The fact that in most accounts so much of the picture has been painted in black and white, and in language of categorical certainty, has served only to paper over the enormous gaps in established knowledge of the event.

In his present introduction to the paper here published, Professor Anderson describes the circumstances surrounding its preparation and the reasons why it was not previously published. Indeed, because of the avowedly tentative and provisional character of this early effort, there would normally be no reason to publish it any more than there would have been to publish the scores of other preliminary drafts prepared over the years by scholars working in the Cornell Modern Indonesia Project. However, this draft has been given a unique prominence. For it has been singled out by a number of those who have subsequently written accounts of the attempted coup, among whom all too many have misrepresented the authors' ideas and cited words or phrases of theirs out of context. Thus there are special reasons now for publishing this draft in its entirety-in fairness both to the authors and to all those interested in the events of 1965-so that readers can make their own assessments rather than having to rely upon doctored extracts and tendentious interpretations by writers hostile to the hypotheses advanced by its authors.

I have found myself in disagreement with some of the views presented in this paper; however, I believe that despite the limited materials available to the authors over the few months that they collected and analyzed their data, this draft, which they wrote at the end of 1965, contains a number of important insights and a considerable amount of significant data which other writers have not taken into account. Thus, those interested in understanding the attempted coup of 1965, particularly if they bear in mind the caveats of Professor Anderson's present introduction, should find this paper useful. - George McT. Kahin

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

THE CONSPIRATORS
The Conspirators
Motivation
The Plan
THE RAIDS
General Yani
General Soeprapto
General Soetojo
Salatiga
Jogjakarta
Surakarta
THE COLLAPSE OF THE COUP
THE RECKONING WITH THE PKI
THE PKI ACTING INDEPENDENTLY TO SEIZE POWER
A PLANNED MOVE BY THE PRESIDENT AGAINST THE ARMY WITH OR WITHOUT THE PKI
THE UNTUNG GROUP ACTING INDEPENDENTLY TO SEIZE POWER

General Harjono
THE DUPES ARRIVE AT HALIM
MURDERS AND DISCUSSIONSTHE STRATEGY OF THE COUP
ALARMS AND EXCURSIONS
THE PRANOTO APPOINTMENT
THE COUNTERCOUP
SOEKARNO ABANDONS HALIM
CENTRAL JAVA
AN UNPLANNED MOVE BY THE PRESIDENT GENERATED
DECREE NO 1 ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INDONESIAN REVOLUTION COUNCIL
DECISION NO 1 CONCERNING THE COMPOSITION OF THE INDONESIAN REVOLUTION COUNCIL
DECISION NO 2 CONCERNING DEMOTION AND PROMOTION IN RANK
AFFILIATIONS OF MEMBERS OF THE INDONESIAN REVOLUTION COUNCIL
THE HARIAN RAKJAT EDITORIAL AND PARTY ATTITUDES DURING THE COUP
THE NJONO CONFESSION
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Benedict Richard O'Gorman Anderson was born in Kunming, China on August 26, 1936. He received a degree in classics from Cambridge University in 1957 and a Ph.D. in government from Cornell University in 1967. He taught at Cornell University until his retirement, as an emeritus professor of international studies, in 2002. His best-known book, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, was first published in 1983. He died of heart failure on December 12, 2015 at the age of 79.

Bibliographic information