A Quarter Century of Community Psychology: Readings from the American Journal of Community Psychology

Front Cover
Tracey A. Revenson, Anthony R. D'Augelli, Sabine E. French, Diane Hughes, David E. Livert, Edward Seidman, Marybeth Shinn, Hirokazu Yoshikawa
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 31, 2002 - Medical - 583 pages
0 Reviews
Looking back over the past quarter century or so, it becomes apparent that Community Psychology has developed a rich tradition of theory, empirical research, action, and innovative methods. Within the field of psychology, community psychology challenges traditional ways of thinking. It considers not only the person but also whole ecological systems, recognizing that the linkages between persons and systems may be as important as either factor alone. It examines both top-down and bottom-up change; it recognizes the need for cultural diversity; and it recognizes the need for both research and praxis-actually, their interaction, which is termed "action research" or "action science. " Many of the important writings have been published in the American Journal of Community Psychology (AJ CP). l As such, the intellectual history of the field is embedded in this journal. In 1996, The Publications Committee of the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA, Division 27 of the American Psychological Association), in cooperation with Plenum Publishing Corporation, published a call for an editor or editorial team to "develop a volume which will use the most impactful papers from the [AJCP] to portray the rich tradition of . . . action research . . . " (Call for Nominations, 1996, p. 17). The editors of the volume you are holding answered that call and were subsequently asked to bring the project to fruition.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
3
III
33
IV
51
V
65
VI
79
VII
81
VIII
87
IX
89
XIX
293
XX
311
XXI
343
XXII
367
XXIII
395
XXIV
409
XXV
445
XXVI
477

X
103
XI
119
XII
121
XIII
147
XIV
163
XV
181
XVI
205
XVII
237
XVIII
265
XXVII
513
XXVIII
535
XXIX
559
XXX
561
XXXI
563
XXXII
564
XXXIII
567
XXXIV
571
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2002)

Anthony R. D'Augelli is Professor of Human Development at The Pennsylvania State University. Bharlotte J. Patterson is Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Marybeth Shinn is Professor of Applied Psychology and Public Policy at New York University. She received her Ph.D. in social and community psychology from the University of Michigan. Shinn studies how social contexts, including social settings, neighborhoods, socioeconomic circumstances, and
social policies, affect individual well-being. With anthropologist Kim Hopper, she is using capability theory to understand questions about environments that foster capabilities for homeless and mentally ill adults, which parallel questions in the current book about settings that promote youth
development. Other work focuses on causes, consequences, and prevention of homelessness for families and individuals. Shinn was a fellow at the Russell Sage Foundation. She has served as president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the Society for Community Research
and Action and received awards for Distinguished Contributions to Theory and Research and Ethnic Minority Mentoring from the latter group.
Hirokazu Yoshikawa is Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He studies the effects of welfare and anti-poverty policies on children; the influence of low-wage work dynamics and conditions on family processes and children; the development of young children in immigrant
families; and whole-grade approaches to music education. He has participated in multiple Congressional briefings on child and family policy and human development. He has received three early career awards from the American Psychological Association (the Louise Kidder Award from the Society for the
Psychological Study of Social Issues, the Boyd McCandless Award forcontributions to developmental psychology, and the Minority Fellowship Program's early career award), as well as the Ethnic Minority Mentorship award from the Society for Community Research and Action (Division 27 of the APA). He
was recently a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Family and Work Policies. In 2004 he was awarded a fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He is editor (with Thomas Weisner and Edward Lowe) of Making It Work: Low-Wage Employment, Family Life,
and Child Development (Russell Sage Foundation, 2006).

Bibliographic information