A Quiet Adjustment: A Novel

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2008 - Fiction - 341 pages
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To dissolve a dreadfully mistaken union between two formidable egos: surely it should only take "a quiet adjustment"? Inspired by the actual biography of Lord Byron—the greatest literary figure and most notorious sex symbol of his age—Benjamin Markovits reimagines Byron's marriage to the capable, intellectual, and tormented Annabella and the scandal that broke open their lives and riveted the world around them: Byron's incestuous relationship with his impetuous half-sister, Gus. Their very different understandings of love and obligation lead them all—and the reader—headlong to a devastating conclusion.Acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic for his memorable prose and acute sense of character, Markovits here sets a new standard for the literary historical novel. A Quiet Adjustment is at once immersed in its period, an homage to Byron and his work, and a thoroughly modern fiction in the psychologically incisive vein of Ian McEwan and Colm T ib n.
 

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A quiet adjustment: a novel

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Markovits, Benjamin. A Quiet Adjustment. Norton. 2008. F ~A vivid imagining of the life of the English poet Lord Bryon and his tormented wife that will engage fans of Byron and historical fiction ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter One
3
Chapter Two
11
Chapter Three
28
Chapter Four
38
Chapter Five
47
Chapter Six
55
Chapter Seven
69
Chapter Eight
75
Chapter Seven
173
Chapter Eight
181
Chapter Nine
200
Chapter One
221
Chapter Two
231
Chapter Three
246
Chapter Four
254
Chapter Five
267

Chapter Nine
84
Chapter One
97
Chapter Two
120
Chapter Three
131
Chapter Four
141
Chapter Five
150
Chapter Six
161
Chapter Six
277
Chapter Seven
287
Chapter Eight
303
Chapter Nine
317
Chapter Ten
326
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About the author (2008)

Benjamin Markovits grew up in Texas and London, where he now lives. He teaches at the University of London. He contributes to the New York Times, The Paris Review, Granta, the Times Literary Supplement, and others.

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