A Resource-Based Habitat View for Conservation: Butterflies in the British Landscape

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John Wiley & Sons, Feb 8, 2010 - Nature - 406 pages
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Winner of the Marsh Book of the Year Award 2012 by the British Ecological Society.

In A Resource-Based Habitat View for Conservation Roger Dennis introduces a novel approach to the understanding of habitats based on resources and conditions required by organisms and their access to them,  a quantum shift from simplistic and ineffectual notions of habitats as vegetation units or biotopes. In drawing attention to what organisms actually use and need in landscapes, it focuses on resource composition, structure and connectedness, all of which describe habitat quality and underpin landscape heterogeneity. This contrasts with the current bipolar view of landscapes made up of habitat patches and empty matrix but illustrates how such a metapopulation approach of isolated patchworks can grow by adopting the new habitat viewpoint.

 The book explores principles underlying this new definition of habitat, and the impact of habitat components on populations, species’ distributions, geographical ranges and range changes, with a view to conserving resources in landscapes for whole communities. It does this using the example of butterflies - the most alluring of insects, flagship organisms and key indicators of environmental health - in the British Isles, where they have been studied most intensively. The book forms essential reading for students, researchers and practitioners in ecology and conservation, particularly those concerned with managing sites and landscapes for wildlife.

 

 

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Contents

Definitions of habitat
2
A SIMPLE MODEL FOR BUTTERFLY
9
Qualifying resource outlets
15
Consumables
23
Adult basking sites and behaviour
29
Adult rests and roosts
35
Symbionts and enemyfree space
41
Edaphic agents as conditioners
51
Topology for resource use and movement
152
Corridors barriers and aggregations
159
LANDSCAPE INFLUENCES
165
features on butterfly resources
193
climate
238
response to specific
245
HABITATS IN BUTTERFLY
256
The single site in butterfly conservation
262

EXPLOITING INDIVIDUAL
79
Principles relating to individual preferences
86
Biotope distinctions among British
101
Principles relating to observations made
108
Principles relating to vegetation succession
117
Searching for ecological order in butterfly life history
127
The link between structure and dynamics
135
Metapopulations and a resource view of
142
Multiple sites in single and multispecies
268
Guiding principles for landscape
277
Internal habitat issues for single patches
284
Butterflies as indicators and flagship
292
References
354
Index
389
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Roger Dennis was educated at Oswestry School, Shropshire and at Durham University where he was awarded a Scholarship, a Class 1 BA in Geography and where later he obtained his PhD in Human Biology. After a short postdoctoral fellowship at Durham, he taught at The Manchester Grammar School until early retirement in 1993 following a spinal injury. Subsequently, he has received a succession of honorary research fellowships during which he has studied butterfly biogeography and ecology, producing over 175 publications. He is author of 'The British Butterflies. Their Origin and Establishment' (1977), 'Butterflies and Climate Change' (1993), joint author of 'Butterflies on British and Irish Offshore Islands' (1996) and edited 'The Ecology of Butterflies in Britain' (1992). He is currently an Honorary Visiting Professor at Staffordshire University and an Honorary Research Fellow at both NERC's Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, and in the School of Life Sciences at Oxford Brookes University; he serves on the editorial board of four journals. In 2006, he received the Marsh Award for Lifetime Achievement in Lepidoptera Conservation. He lives in Cheshire with his wife Margaret and has one daughter, Pamela.

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