A Return to Sanditon

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Anne Toledo, Feb 15, 2011 - Fiction
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For real lovers of Jane Austen "s work, a completion of her unfinished Sanditon as she might possibly have envisaged it herself. No zombies or other anachronistic gimmicks, but a number of interlaced love stories set against a gently satirical picture of the fads and fancies of the times, above all the rising fashion for sea bathing and the greed and folly that accompanied it.When Charlotte Heywood leaves her large and conservative family of Kentish landowners to stay with the Parkers in the new resort of Sanditon, she expects nothing more than a tranquil seaside holiday. She soon however becomes involved in the life of the little town, and is challenged to measure her own traditional values and tastes against those of financial speculators, affected social climbers, fashionable hypochondriacs, and followers of the new romantic ideas in the arts and human behaviour. Her initial attitude is that of an amused spectator, but soon, to her own surprise, she finds herself falling in love with her host "s younger brother, the witty and fascinating Sidney Parker. Sidney however leaves Sanditon abruptly in the company of Charlotte "s beautiful and enigmatic friend Clara Brereton, with whom Sir Edward Denham, penniless nephew of the town "s patroness and Sgreat lady , is in love, to his avaricious aunt "s displeasure, and the town buzzes with rumours of an elopement Anne Toledo has taught English Literature at university level for many years, specialising in the nineteenth-century novel in general, and in Jane Austen in particular. She is a devoted Janeite, and hopes that this story will appeal to those who share her love and appreciation of Jane Austen "s work at all levels ‚€œ as romance, as humorous observation, and as moral satire, and also as a fascinating picture of daily life in middle-class England in the years immediately following the Napoleonic wars.
 

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Contents

BOOK ONE
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER 16
CHAPTER 17
CHAPTER 19
END OF BOOK I
CHAPTER 23
CHAPTER 25
CHAPTER 26

CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 12
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 27
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Anne Toledo was born in 1937 to English parents and spent her childhood in wartime and postwar London ‚ she still has vivid memories of air-raids, evacuations and doodlebugs, and of the austerity and optimism of the postwar years. An only child, she grew up as a voracious reader, especially of fiction, and was much influenced by the romantic stories of her godmother, the best-selling novelist Anne Duffield. After boarding-school (Cheltenham Ladies‚ College) and an M.A. degree in Classics (Literae Humaniores) at Oxford University, she worked in London for some years in the pre-yuppie world of advertising and market research. Longing for a less competitive and more natural lifestyle, she awarded herself a ‚sabbatical year‚ in Italy, with the avowed purpose of learning the language and visiting the country ‚ but while there she met and married her Italian husband, settled in Brescia, not far from Lake Garda, and brought up a family. In the meantime she studied for a second degree in Italy, this time in Modern Languages, as there was as yet no international recognition for foreign degrees. With her Italian degree, she started her career as a teacher, working her way up from evening classes in language schools through high-school teaching to a tenured university post as Research Fellow in English Literature, which took her from Brescia to Verona, then Milan and finally back to Brescia, in the Languages Faculty of the Universit√ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, where she specialized in teaching the nineteenth-century English novel, with particular attention to Jane Austen. Under her maiden name of Leslie-Anne Crowley she has published academic monographs on Langland, Spenser and Marlowe, and articles on Milton, Quarles, Stevie Smith and ‚ naturally - Jane Austen. She retired in 2000 and since then has much enjoyed the freedom to spend time with her husband and grown-up sons, to read and write, and to indulge in such pleasant pastimes as computer games, puzzles of all kinds, and generally pottering. ‚A Return to Sanditon‚ is her first venture into fiction, and she enjoyed writing it so much that she is now working on a second Austen completion, this time of ‚The Watsons‚.

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