A Sense of the Mysterious: Science and the Human Spirit

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jan 18, 2005 - Science - 240 pages
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From the bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams comes this lyrical and insightful collection of science writing that delves into the mysteries of the scientific process--physics, astronomy, mathamatics--and exposes its beauty and intrigue.

In these brilliant essays, Lightman explores the emotional life of science, the power of imagination, the creative moment, and the alternate ways in which scientists and humanists think about the world. Along the way, he provides in-depth portraits of some of the great geniuses of our time, including Albert Einstein, Richard Feynman, Edward Teller, and astronomer Vera Rubin. Thoughtful, beautifully written, and wonderfully original, A Sense of the Mysterious confirms Alan Lightman's unique position at the crossroads of science and art.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jwood652 - LibraryThing

Occasionally I decide to read something a bit more educational. This collection of essays, by Alan Lightman, explores how we use science to understand our world. Included are essays on not only how we ... Read full review

A sense of the mysterious: science and the human spirit

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Whether you are a fan of Lightman's writing (e.g., Einstein's Dreams ) or have not yet experienced his astonishingly heartfelt reflections on science, this collection of 11 previously published essays ... Read full review

Contents

A Sense of the Mysterious
Words
Inventions of the Mind
The Contradictory Genius
The One and Only
A Scientist Dying Young
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

ALAN LIGHTMAN is the author of six novels, including Einstein’s Dreams, which was an international bestseller, and The Diagnosis, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. He is also the author of three collections of essays and several books on science. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, Granta, Harper’s, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and Nature, among other publications. Since beginning his career as a theoretical physicist, Lightman has taught at Harvard and at MIT, where he was the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in science and in the humanities. He lives in the Boston area.

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