A Sermon Preached at St. Aldate's Church, Oxford, on Behalf of a Proposed Church and Parsonage House at Headington Quarry

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J. Vincent, 1847 - Bible - 15 pages
 

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Page 1 - And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him, and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again I will repay thee.' Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves?" And he said, "He that showed mercy on him." Then said Jesus unto him, "Go, and do thou likewise.
Page 7 - He who loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how shall he love God whom he hath not seen ? You, Mr.
Page 9 - And lo, a spirit taketh him, and he suddenly crieth out ; and it teareth him that he foameth again, and bruising him, hardly departeth from him. 40. And I besought thy disciples to cast him out, and they could not.
Page 4 - ... nature, attached pleasure to the performance of acts of kindness to others : and this He has done to help us to bear the first trouble, self-denial, and sacrifice, which is implied in imparting to others what we might consume upon ourselves. He has placed us in the midst of objects fitted to draw out these emotions. Thus He has provided for us a system of natural discipline and training in order that we by acting up to its requirements may, through the help of His grace, form a character of beneficence...
Page 4 - Himself, in which is the creature's only true happiness. Now the work of our natural selfishness is the exact opposite of all this. It begins by leading us to find our gratification in those pleasures which relate especially to ourselves. Thus it clogs the exercise of those benevolent instincts of the heart which are not simply either right or wrong, since the acts prompted by them are done merely as being...
Page 5 - ... all this. It begins by leading us to find our gratification in those pleasures which relate especially to ourselves. Thus it clogs the exercise of those benevolent instincts of the heart which are not simply either right or wrong, since the acts prompted by them are done merely as being pleasurable, not as being right, but yet which are intended to help us in the first labour of doing right. And as these natural gifts are neglected, selfishness grows greater in the contracting heart. The man...
Page 4 - GOD has furnished our hearts with instinctive sympathies for those around us. He has, by the constitution of our nature, attached pleasure to the performance of acts of kindness to others; and this he has done to help us to bear the first trouble, self-denial, and sacrifice, which is implied iť imparting to others what we might consume upon ourselves.
Page 7 - How shall he who kills within himself the natural instinct of aftection for those he sees, ever rise to the high gift of loving God, whom he can know only by his faith ? This conduct must be most offensive to the Spirit of God; and under a dispensation of the Spirit, such as is that under which we live, it must therefore be most ruinous to man. It is an intense denial of the work of Christ's cross, whereby ha made all men one in the unity of his own body. For the second Adam thus restored all the...
Page 6 - For from giving up the sense of wider relationship, he soon goes on to lose all real sense of the nearest and the closest. First it is himself, and those who are wellnigh part of himself, against the world; but let a question rise, or seem to rise, between himself and even those closest to him, and even they shall be sacrificed. Be they parent, wife, or child, the thoroughly selfish man is ready to use them too, merely as the instruments of gratifying an all-grasping self.

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