A Short History of Structural Linguistics

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 23, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 163 pages
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This concise history of structural linguistics charts its development from the 1870s to the present day. It explains what structuralism was and why its ideas are still central today. For structuralists a language is a self-contained and tightly organised system whose history is of changes from one state of the system to another. This idea has its origin in the nineteenth century and was developed in the twentieth by Saussure and his followers, including the school of Bloomfield in the United States. Through the work of Chomsky, especially, it is still very influential. Matthews examines the beginnings of structuralism and analyses the vital role played in it by the study of sound systems and the problems of how systems change. He discusses theories of the overall structure of a language, the 'Chomskyan revolution' in the 1950s, and the structuralist theories of meaning.
 

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Contents

Languages
5
21 Linguistics as the study of language systems
10
22 Languages as sets of utterances
20
23 The autonomy of linguistics
25
Sound systems
31
31 The prehistory of the phoneme
32
32 Phonology
40
33 Structuralism
48
52 Phonology and grammar
81
53 Deep structure and surface structure
88
Internalised language
96
61 Generative grammars
97
62 Knowing a language
103
63 Universal Grammar and diachrony
113
Structural semantics
118
71 Meanings as invariants
119

Diachrony
52
41 Diachronic phonology
55
42 System and norm
61
43 Universals
69
The architecture of a language system
74
51 Expression and content
75
72 Semantic fields
126
73 Semantic interpretations
133
Structuralism in 2000
142
References
154
Index
160
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Diachronic Syntax
Ian Roberts
No preview available - 2007
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