A Short History of World War I

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Harper Collins, Mar 17, 2009 - History - 352 pages
5 Reviews
World War I was a bloodletting so vast and unprecedented that for a generation it was known simply as the Great War. Casualty lists reached unimagined proportions as the same ground -- places like Ypres and the Somme -- was fought over again and again. Other major bloody battles remain vivid in memory to this day: Gallipoli and the Battle of Jutland are but two examples. Europe was at war with itself, and the effect on Western civilization was profound, its repercussions felt even today.

World War I saw the introduction of modern technology into the military arena: The tank, airplane, machine gun, submarine, and -- most lethal of all -- poison gas, all received their first widespread use. Professor Stokesbury analyzes these technological innovations and the war's complex military campaigns in lucid detail. At the same time he discusses the great political events that unfolded during the war, such as the Russian Revolution and the end of the Hapsburg dynasty, putting the social and political side of the war into the context of modern European history.

A Short History of World War I is the first history of this war to be written in twenty years. It incorporates recent research and current thinking about the war in a highly readable and lively style.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - waltzmn - LibraryThing

So which would you rather have, comprehensibility or comprehensiveness? Few writers of history do a better job of explaining than does James L. Stokesbury. His prose is straightforward and easy to ... Read full review

world war I

User Review  - Hannah C. - Overstock.com

I BOUGHT IT FOR MY HUSBAND . AND HE LIKED IT VERY MUCH. Read full review

Contents

The Long Fuse
11
The Explosion
22
The Opening Battles in the West
36
The Marne and the Race to the Sea
49
The War in the East
61
The War at Sea
75
The Western front 1915
90
Turkey Itafy and the United States
102
The Nadir of the War
194
The Collapse of Russia
205
The Submarine Campaign The United States Enters the War
216
The Western Front 1917
227
Change and Continuity
244
The German Spring Offensives 1918
259
Allied Counteroffensive
281
The Collapse of the Central Powers
294

The Dardanelles
115
Success and Failure in the East
128
Verdun and the Somme
140
Another Such Victory and We Are Lost
157
The Navy Gets Its Chance
168
Imperial Wars and Colonial Campaigns
180
Peacemaking
308
Epilogue
318
Suggestions for Further Reading
325
Index
337
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Page 117 - The Admiralty should prepare for a naval expedition in February to bombard and take the Gallipoli Peninsula, with Constantinople as its objective.
Page 328 - SJ Shaw and EK Shaw, History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977), Vol.
Page 124 - Let me bring my lads face to face with Turks in the open field, we must beat them every time because British volunteer soldiers are superior individuals to Anatolians, Syrians or Arabs and are animated with a superior ideal and an equal joy in battle.
Page 81 - Sir Christopher Cradock. The Germans sank the two armored cruisers in a short action, and the other British ships made their escape. This disaster brought a quick reaction from Lord Fisher. The battle cruisers Inflexible and Invincible were sent to the South...
Page 34 - Now, God be thanked Who has matched us with His hour, And caught our youth, and wakened us from sleeping. A SENSE OF HORROR Masefield, Brooke and other "Georgian" poets popularized the reading of poetry and some of the more chauvinistic critics predicted a great renaissance of letters. But writing hardly took the course they expected. The mood of war...
Page 83 - Jellicoe was the only man who could lose the war in an afternoon" (if he allowed himself to become involved in an unsuccessful battle with the Germans).
Page 16 - Europe which they thought had dawned when the German Empire was proclaimed in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles was still postponed.
Page 123 - Gallant fellows, these soldiers; they always go for the thickest place in the fence...

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About the author (2009)

James L. Stokesbury is the author of A Short History of World War I, A Short History of World War II, A Short History of the Korean War, and A Short History of the American Revolution. Before his death in 1995 he was a professor of history at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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