A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology

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SAGE, May 25, 2004 - Psychology - 168 pages
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A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology gives an accessible overview of the field for psychology students and anyone considering training as a clinical psychologist.

Setting out the theoretical and practical dimensions of clinical psychology, the authors examine its origins, knowledge base and applications with different client groups, in different contexts and through different modalities (individuals, groups, couples, families and organizations). They also highlight issues affecting everyday practice - from professional relationships to government policy.

Drawing on the first-hand experiences of people who have recently qualified, the book describes the process of training and the transition that takes place from trainee to practitioner. Throughout, the book captures a sense of clinical psychology as a dynamic and changing field which has grown up fast alongside other more established professions involved in mental health care and which is continuing to evolve in response to contemporary needs.

As an overview of the field, A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology is an ideal text for undergraduate and post-graduate students in psychology and as initial reading for clinical psychology courses.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
24
V
42
VI
64
VII
85
VIII
103
IX
119
X
136
XI
143
XII
144
XIII
145
XIV
157
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About the author (2004)

David Pilgrim is Professor of Health and Social Policy, Department of Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology at the University of Liverpool, UK.

After training and working as a clinical psychologist he completed a PhD examining psychotherapy in the organisational setting of the British NHS. He then went on the complete a Master’s in sociology. He has worked at the boundary between clinical psychology and medical sociology for the past twenty years and has produced over 60 articles in peer-reviewed journals, based upon his research into mental health policy and practice. His years working in the British NHS provided him with extensive everyday experience of the theoretical and policy aspects of mental health expressed in practical settings. One his books, A Sociology of Mental Health and Illness (3rd edition, Open University Press, 2005), co-authored with Anne Rogers, won the British Medical Association’s medical book of the year award for 2006. Currently he is writing a book on critical realism and mental health (Routledge, 2014) and is co-editing (with John Hall) a book on the history of British clinical psychology for the British Psychological Society. This will commemorate the fiftieth anniversary in 2015 of the establishment in the latter of the Division of Clinical Psychology.

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