A Silent Revolution?: Gender and Wealth in English Canada, 1860-1930

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Jun 22, 2014 - Business & Economics - 384 pages
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Peter Baskerville situates women in their immediate gendered and familial environments as well as within broader legal, financial, spatial, temporal, and historiographical contexts. He analyses women's probates, wills, land ownership, holdings of real and chattel mortgages, investment in stocks and bonds, and self employment, revealing that women controlled wealth to an extent similar to that of most men and invested and managed wealth in increasingly similar, and in some cases more aggressive, ways.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Victoria and Hamilton 18691931
17
Women and Men in Victoria and Hamilton 18801930
55
Investment in Banking and Insurance Stocks in Ontario 18601911
76
Land and Gender in Victoria and Hamilton 18811901
93
Legal Regimes Gender and Mortgage Markets in Victoria and Hamilton 18811921
122
The Market for Chattels in Victoria 18611902
163
7 Canadian Urban Women in Business
190
Gender and Family Enterprise in Urban Canada at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
222
Conclusion
236
APPENDICES
249
Tables
261
Notes
307
Bibliography
345
Index
369
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About the author (2014)

One of Canada's leading business social scientists, Peter Baskerville is professor of history, University of Victoria, in-coming chair of Modern Western Canadian History, University of Alberta, and the author of several books, including, with Eric Sager, Unwilling Idlers: The Urban Unemployed and Their Families in Late Victorian Canada.

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