A Small Nation of People: W. E. B. Du Bois and African American Portraits of Progress

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Harper Collins, Oct 4, 2005 - Social Science - 208 pages
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An incredible treasure trove of more than 150 illustrations detailing a small nation of African Americans prepared to make their mark on America

 

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A small nation of people: W. E. B. Du Bois and African American portraits of progress

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This book revisits the American Negro Exhibit of the 1900 International Exposition in Paris with a focus on the contributions made by W.E.B. Du Bois. Du Bois, then a sociology professor at Atlanta ... Read full review

Contents

Preface by James H Billington Librarian of Congress
11
Selections from the Photographs at the Exposition des Negres dAmenque
79
Notes
198
Copyright

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Page 186 - Above our modern socialism, and out of the worship of the mass, must persist and evolve that higher individualism which the centres of culture protect; there must come a loftier respect for the sovereign human soul that seeks to know itself and the world about it...
Page 98 - Work, culture, liberty, — all these we need, not singly but together, not successively but together, each growing and aiding each, and all striving toward that vaster ideal that swims before the Negro people, the ideal of human brotherhood, gained through the unifying ideal of Race; the ideal of fostering and developing the traits and talents of the Negro, not in opposition to or contempt for other races, but rather in large conformity to the greater ideals of the American Republic, in order that...
Page 47 - Folk, declared that the problem of the 20th century was "the problem of the color line." He said that the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line — the relation of the darker to the lighter races of men in Asia and Africa, in America and the islands of the sea.
Page 23 - It is a peculiar sensation, this doubleconsciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his two-ness, — an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.
Page 166 - How beautiful he was, with his olive-tinted flesh and dark gold ringlets, his eyes of mingled blue and brown, his perfect little limbs, and the soft voluptuous roll which the blood of Africa had moulded into his features! I held him in my arms, after we had sped far away...
Page 176 - ... through others I have followed carefully the life-work of scores; I have taught some of them and some of the pupils whom they have taught, lived in homes which they have builded, and looked at life through their eyes. Comparing them as a class with my fellow students in New England and in Europe, I cannot hesitate in saying...
Page 38 - I am just as opposed to Booker Washington as a voter, with all his Anglo-Saxon re-enforcements, as I am to the coconut-headed, chocolate-colored, typical little coon, Andy Dotson, who blacks my shoes every morning. Neither is fit to perform the supreme function of citizenship.
Page 25 - This, Mr. Chairman, is perhaps the negroes' temporary farewell to the American Congress; but let me say, Phoenix-like he will rise up some day and come again. These parting words are in behalf of an outraged, heart-broken, bruised, and bleeding, but Godfearing people, faithful, industrious, loyal people— rising people, full of potential force.
Page 88 - ... this nation— we fought their battles, shared their sorrow, mingled our blood with theirs, and generation after generation have pleaded with a headstrong, careless people to despise not Justice, Mercy, and Truth, lest the nation be smitten with a curse. Our song, our toil, our cheer, and warning have been given to this nation in blood-brotherhood. Are not these gifts worth the giving? Is not this work and striving? Would America have been America without her Negro people?

About the author (2005)

A MacArthur Fellow, David Levering Lewis is the author of several books, including W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century and Du Bois: Biography of a Race. He was awarded the Pulizter for both books, which is unprecedented. A Professor of History at NYU, he has also taught at Rutgers University.

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