A Small Place

Front Cover
Macmillan, Jul 1, 1988 - Biography & Autobiography - 81 pages
1 Review
This expansive essay shows us -- in a delighfully Swiftian mode -- what we have not yet seen of Antigua, the small island in the British West Indies where Kincaid grew up.
 

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A small place

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Kincaid here examines the geography and history of Antigua, where she was raised. We first see the island through the eyes of the typical North American tourist, who aims to exchange his or her own ... Read full review

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User Review  - Mitchell A. Leep - Goodreads

This little masterpiece made me feel like a grade-A asshole. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

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About the author (1988)

Jamaica Kincaid came to the United States in 1966 as a free-lance writer and is now on staff at the New Yorker. Her first volume of stories, At the Bottom of the River (1983), depicts men and women alienated from each other by conflict, physical separation, or death. The story "My Mother" vividly describes the painful separation between mother and daughter; and the stories in Annie John (1985) clearly reveal that the world of the past cannot be recaptured. Kincaid's poetic use of language and everyday images allows the reader to experience ordinary events with a new and heightened sensitivity. Kincaid is a relatively new writer whose works are beginning to receive critical attention.

Bibliographic information