A Socrates for all Seasons - Alexander Meiklejohn and Deliberative Democracy

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iUniverse, Jun 22, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 400 pages
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This is the story of a reform minded man who translated his interest in liberal education and academic freedom into a unique interpretation of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. Although he died in 1964 his interpretation is still being applied to free speech cases that come before the U.S. Supreme Court. In the early days of the 20th century he was Dean at Brown University, President of Amherst College and founder of the Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin. In the xenophobic aftermath of World War II he became a national leader in defense of political speech. This led him into a dialogue with justices of the Supreme Court, despite the fact he had no formal training in the law. His theory of the First Amendment holds that its provision for free speech exists as much for the public’s need to hear and know as it does for the individual’s right to speak.
 

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Contents

Chapter One The Early Years
1
Chapter Two Student Days
19
Chapter Three Beginning an Academic Career
42
Chapter Four Challenge at Amherst
68
Chapter Five Controversy and Defeat
97
Chapter Six Experiment at Wisconsin
126
Chapter Seven Bridging Between Hutchins and Dewey
150
Chapter Eight New Ventures in California
173
Chapter Eleven Communism and Loyalty
255
Chapter Twelve Expanding the Theory
280
Chapter Thirteen The Venerable Teacher
307
Chapter Fourteen Finishing Touches
337
Epilogue
363
About the Author
369
Acknowledgments
371
Bibliography
373

Chapter Nine War Years and PostWar Planning
202
Chapter Ten Taking on the Supreme Court
230

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