A Son's Return: Selected Essays of Sterling A. Brown

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UPNE, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 314 pages
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This volume selects for the first time essays and reviews by the influential African American cultural critic and poet Sterling A. Brown. Like the writings of many of his contemporaries in the New Negro Movement, Brown's work celebrates and fosters a richer appreciation of the complexity and vitality of African American cultural expression. Ranging over topics from folklore to sports, from literature to music, the pioneering essays collected here reflect the major themes and concerns of Brown's career, and together they demonstrate his critical acumen, commitment to inclusive politics, and consummate style.
 

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A Son's Return: Selected Essays of Sterling A. Brown (Northeastern Library of Black Literature)

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Sanders (English, Emory Univ.) has written scholarly articles about Sterling Brown, an influential and prolific African American writer of the "New Negro Movement," a term that Brown preferred over ... Read full review

A Son's Return: Selected Essays of Sterling A. Brown (The Northeastern Library of Black Literature)

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Sanders (English, Emory Univ.) has written scholarly articles about Sterling Brown, an influential and prolific African American writer of the "New Negro Movement," a term that Brown preferred over ... Read full review

Contents

Oh Didnt He Ramble
1
REVIEWS
9
The Negro in Washington
25
The American Race Problem As Reflected in American
47
Count Us In
68
Athletics and the Arts
99
AMERICAN LITERATURE
125
Folk Literature
207
Negro Folk Expression
232
Spirituals Seculars Ballads and Work
243
Stray Notes on Jazz
265
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About the author (1996)

Sterling Brown devoted his life as a writer to a development of an authentic African American literature and to a career as an educator of African American students, especially at Howard University, where he taught for 40 years. He was among the first to identify folklore as central to the black aesthetic. Brown published his first book of poetry, Southern Road, in 1932, but, although the book was well received, Brown met critical and publishing resistance to his next collection. Discouraged, Brown turned his energies to producing a steady stream of essays, reviews, and sketches about African American life. Negro Poetry and Drama and The Negro in American Fiction, both published in 1938, are seminal studies; and his anthology of African American literature, The Negro Caravan (1941), defined the field as a scholarly and academic discipline. The Collected Poems (1980), which contains many early poems never before published, assures Brown's fame as a poet at the same time that it serves as a painful reminder of a gift that was stunted because it was ignored. A first-rate narrative poet and a master of the folk idiom, Brown was, for many, a bridge between nineteenth- and twentieth-century African American literature. He is a writer who helped to define African American literature and experience for blacks and whites alike.

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