A Source Book in the History of Psychology

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Richard J. Herrnstein, Edwin G. Boring
Harvard University Press, Jan 1, 1965 - Psychology - 636 pages
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This is a source book unique in its scope, clarity, and general interest. Its 116 excerpts range in time from Epicurus (ca. 300 B.C.) to the turn of the present century and sometimes, when continuity requires, a little beyond (as to K. S. Lashley, 1929). It includes excerpts from Kepler (1604) on the inverted retinal image, Descartes (1650) on the soul's interaction with the machine of the body, Newton (1675) on the seven colors of the spectrum, Locke (1700) on association of ideas, Whytt (1751) on the spinal reflex, Weber (1834) on Weber's law, Darwin (1859) on evolution, Sechenov (1863) on reflexology, Hughlings Jackson (1884) on nervous dissolution, William James (1890) on associationism, Thorndike, Pavlov, Wertheimer, Watson, and 70 other great figures in the history of psychology.

Arranged by topic rather than in the usual strict chronological order, each of the first fourteen chapters traces the development of one important subject in experimental and quantitative psychology. The final chapter discusses the history of thinking about the nature of psychology itself. The editors provide an introduction to each chapter and each excerpt, indicating the significance of the content to follow and establishing historical continuity.

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Contents

SENSORY SPECIFICATION I
1
Auditory Specific Nerve Energies 1863
44
PSYCHOPHYSICS AND SENSORY
60
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Richard J. Herrnstein was Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University.

Edwin C. Boring is Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology, Emeritus, at Harvard University.

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