A Speaking Aristocracy: Transforming Public Discourse in Eighteenth-century Connecticut

Front Cover
UNC Press Books, 1999 - History - 511 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
As cultural authority was reconstituted in the Revolutionary era, knowledge reconceived in the age of Enlightenment, and the means of communication radically altered by the proliferation of print, speakers and writers in eighteenth-century America began t
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

MEANING AND MORAL ORDER
17
The Power of the Public Covenant
24
Only a Great Awakening Jonathan Edwards and the Regulation of Religious Discourse
86
Legalism and Orthodoxy Thomas Clap and the Transformation of Legal Culture
144
CULTIVATION AND ENLIGHTENMENT
185
The Experimental Philosophy of Farming Jared Eliot and the Cultivation of Connecticut
190
Christian Knowledge and Revolutionary New England The Education of Ezra Stiles
230
REVOLUTION AND STEADY HABITS
279
Reawakening the Public Mind Timothy Dwight and the Rhetoric of New England
327
Political Characters and Public Words
386
The New Politics of Revolution and Steady Habits
461
Connecticut Imprints
487
Connecticut Election Sermons
491
A Note on the Historiography of the Great Awakening
495
Index
499
Copyright

Print Poetry and Politics John Trumbull and the Transformation of the Public Sphere
285

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - Rethinking the Public Sphere: A Contribution to the Critique of Actually Existing Democracy," in Habermas and the Public Sphere, ed.

About the author (1999)

Christopher Grasso is associate professor of history at the College of William and Mary and editor of the William and Mary Quarterly.

Bibliographic information